Etymology
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dip (n.2)

"stupid person, eccentric person," 1920s slang, perhaps a back-formation from dippy. "Dipshit is an emphatic form of dip (2); dipstick may be a euphemism or may reflect putative dipstick 'penis' " [DAS].

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solder (v.)
mid-14c., sawd "mend by soldering," from solder (n.). Modern form is a re-Latinization from early 15c. Related: Soldered; soldering.
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dip (v.)

Old English dyppan "to plunge or immerse temporarily in water, to baptize by immersion," from Proto-Germanic *daupejanan (source also of Old Norse deypa "to dip," Danish døbe "to baptize," Old Frisian depa, Dutch dopen, German taufen, Gothic daupjan "to baptize"), related to Old English diepan "immerse, dip," and probably a causative of Proto-Germanic *deup- "deep" (see deep (adj.)).

Intransitive sense of "plunge into water or other liquid" and transferred sense "to sink or drop down a short way" are from late 14c. From c. 1600 as "to raise or take up by a dipping action;" from 1660s as "to incline downward;" from 1776 as "to lower and raise (a flag, etc.) as if by immersing."

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dip (n.1)

1590s, "act of dipping," from dip (v.). Sense of "a downward slope" is by 1708. Meaning "liquid into which something is to be dipped" is attested by 1825, in 19c. especially "sweet sauce for pudding, etc.," also "juices and fat left after cooking meat." The sense "thick, savory sauce for dunking pieces of raw vegetables" (by 1962) is probably a modern re-coinage.

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solder (n.)

early 14c., soudur, from Old French soldure, soudeure, from souder, originally solder, "to consolidate, close, fasten together, join with solder" (13c.), from Latin solidare "to make solid," from solidus "solid" (see solid (adj.)).

Modern form in English is a re-Latinization from early 15c. The loss of Latin -l- in that position on the way to Old French is regular, as poudre from pulverem, cou from collum, chaud from calidus. The -l- typically is sounded in British English but not in American, according to OED, but Fowler wrote that solder without the "l" was "The only pronunciation I have ever heard, except from the half-educated to whom spelling is a final court of appeal ..." and was baffled by the OED's statement that it was American. Related: Soldered; soldering.

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sheep-dip (n.)

"preparation for washing sheep," by 1865, from sheep (n.) + dip (n.1).

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skinny-dipping (n.)
1959, from skinny + dip (v.). Skinny-dip is from 1962.
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braze (v.1)
1580s, "to expose to the action of fire" perhaps (but the sense evolution is odd) from French braser "to solder," in Old French, "to burn," related to brese "embers," ultimately from West Germanic *brasa, from PIE root *bhreu- "to boil, bubble, effervesce, burn." Related: Brazed; brazing. Sense of "to solder" is attested in English from 1670s.
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dipstick (n.)

"rod for measuring the depth of a liquid" (originally and especially the oil in a motor engine), 1927; see dip (v.) + stick (n.). For slang "penis" sense, see dip (n.2).

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ladle (v.)
"to lift or dip with a ladle," 1758, from ladle (n.). Related: Ladled; ladling.
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