Etymology
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dignity (n.)
Origin and meaning of dignity

c. 1200, "state of being worthy," from Old French dignite "dignity, privilege, honor," from Latin dignitatem (nominative dignitas) "worthiness," from dignus "worth (n.), worthy, proper, fitting," from PIE *dek-no-, suffixed form of root *dek- "to take, accept."

From c. 1300 as "an elevated office, civil or ecclesiastical," also "honorable place or elevated rank." From late 14c. as "gravity of countenance."

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infra dig. 
"beneath one's dignity, unbecoming to one's position in society," 1824, colloquial abbreviation of Latin infra dignitatem "beneath the dignity of." See infra- + dignity.
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dignitary (n.)

"one who holds an exalted rank or office," 1670s; see dignity + -ary. Related: Dignitaries (plural).

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*dek- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to take, accept."

It forms all or part of: condign; dainty; decent; decor; decorate; decorous; deign; dignify; dignity; diplodocus; disciple; discipline; disdain; docent; Docetism; docile; docimacy; doctor; doctrine; document; dogma; dogmatic; doxology; heterodox; indignance; indignant; indignation; indignity; orthodox; paradox; synecdoche.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit daśasyati "shows honor, is gracious," dacati "makes offerings, bestows;" Greek dokein "to appear, seem, think," dekhesthai "to accept;" Latin decere "to be fitting or suitable," docere "to teach," decus "grace, ornament."
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undignified (adj.)
1680s, of clergy, "not holding a position of dignity," from un- (1) "not" + dignified. Meaning "lacking in dignity of manner" is attested from 1782.
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rabbinate (n.)

"dignity or office of a rabbi," 1702, from rabbin "rabbi" (see rabbinical) + -ate (1).

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mayorship (n.)

"the office or dignity of a mayor," late 15c., from mayor + -ship.

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prettiness (n.)

"Beauty without dignity; neat elegance without elevation" [Johnson], 1520s, from pretty (adj.) + -ness.

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ladyship (n.)
"rank or dignity of a lady," early 13c.; see lady + -ship.
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earldom (n.)

"the territory, jurisdiction, or dignity of an earl," Old English eorldom; see earl + -dom.

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