Etymology
Advertisement
dialogue (v.)

"to discourse together," c. 1600, from dialogue (n.). Related: Dialogued; dialoguing.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
dialogue (n.)

c. 1200, "literary work consisting of a conversation between two or more persons," from Old French dialoge and directly from Latin dialogus, from Greek dialogos "conversation, dialogue," related to dialogesthai "converse," from dia "across, between" (see dia-) + legein "to speak" (from PIE root *leg- (1) "to collect, gather," with derivatives meaning "to speak (to 'pick out words')").

The sense was extended by c. 1400 to "a conversation between two or more persons." The mistaken belief that it can mean only "conversation between two persons" is from confusion of dia- and di- (1); the error goes back to at least 1532, when trialogue was coined needlessly for "a conversation between three persons." And compare quadrilogue "dialogue of four speakers" (late 15c.), in the title of the English translation of "Quadrilogue invectif," which consists of an allegorical dialogue between the Three Estates and a personified France.

A word that has been used for "conversation between two persons" and cannot mean otherwise is the hybrid duologue (1864).

Related entries & more 
dialogic (adj.)

"pertaining to or of the nature of a dialogue," 1833; see dialogue (n.) + -ic. Related: Dialogical (c. 1600).

Related entries & more 
*leg- (1)

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to collect, gather," with derivatives meaning "to speak" on the notion of "to gather words, to pick out words."

It forms all or part of: alexia; analects; analogous; analogue; analogy; anthology; apologetic; apologue; apology; catalogue; coil; colleague; collect; college; collegial; Decalogue; delegate; dialect; dialogue; diligence; doxology; dyslexia; eclectic; eclogue; elect; election; epilogue; hapax legomenon; homologous; horology; ideologue; idiolect; intelligence; lectern; lectio difficilior; lection; lector; lecture; leech (n.2) "physician;" legacy; legal; legate; legend; legible; legion; legislator; legitimate; lesson; lexicon; ligneous; ligni-; logarithm; logic; logistic; logo-; logogriph; logopoeia; Logos; -logue; -logy; loyal; monologue; neglect; neologism; philology; privilege; prolegomenon; prologue; relegate; sacrilege; select; syllogism; tautology; trilogy.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek legein "to say, tell, speak, declare; to count," originally, in Homer, "to pick out, select, collect, enumerate;" lexis "speech, diction;" logos "word, speech, thought, account;" Latin legere "to gather, choose, pluck; read," lignum "wood, firewood," literally "that which is gathered," legare "to depute, commission, charge," lex "law" (perhaps "collection of rules"); Albanian mb-ledh "to collect, harvest;" Gothic lisan "to collect, harvest," Lithuanian lesti "to pick, eat picking;" Hittite less-zi "to pick, gather."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
stichomythia (n.)
"dialogue in alternate lines," Latinized from Greek stikhomythia, from stikhos (see stichic) + mythos "speech, talk" (see myth) + abstract noun ending -ia. Related: Stichomythic.
Related entries & more 
collogue (v.)

1590s (implied in colloguing) "to flatter, curry favor," a word of unknown origin; perhaps from French colloque "conference, consultation" (16c., from Latin colloqui "speak together;" see colloquy) and influenced by dialogue or colleague. Intransitive sense "to have a private understanding with, conspire, collude" is from 1640s.

Related entries & more 
interlocution (n.)
"interchange of speech, dialogue, action of talking and replying," 1530s, from Latin interlocutionem (nominative interlocutio) "a speaking between, interlocution," noun of action from past participle stem of interloqui "to speak between; to interrupt," from inter "between" (see inter-) + loqui "to speak" (from PIE root *tolkw- "to speak").
Related entries & more 
eclogue (n.)
"short poem," especially a pastoral dialogue, mid-15c., from Latin ecloga "selection, short poem, eclogue," from Greek ekloge "a selection," especially of poems, from eklegein "to pick out, select," from ek "out" (see ex-) + legein "gather, choose," from PIE root *leg- (1) "to collect, gather."
Related entries & more 
colloquium (n.)

c. 1600, "conversation, dialogue" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin colloquium "conference, conversation," literally "a speaking together," from com- "together" (see com-) + -loquium "speaking," from loqui "to speak" (from PIE root *tolkw- "to speak"). Also as a legal term; meaning "a meeting for discussion, assembly, conference, seminar" is attested by 1844.

Related entries & more