Etymology
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A-frame 

type of framework shaped like the capital letter "A," by 1889; as a type of building construction in this shape from 1932.

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frame (v.)

Old English framian "to profit, be helpful, avail, benefit," from fram (adj., adv.) "active, vigorous, bold," originally "going forward," from fram (prep.) "forward; from" (see from). Influenced by related Old English fremman "help forward, promote; do, perform, make, accomplish," and Old Norse fremja "to further, execute." Compare German frommen "avail, profit, benefit, be of use."

Sense focused in Middle English from "make ready" (mid-13c.) to "prepare timber for building" (late 14c.). Meaning "compose, devise" is first attested 1540s. The criminal slang sense of "blame an innocent person" (1920s) is probably from earlier sense of "plot in secret" (1900), perhaps ultimately from meaning "fabricate a story with evil intent," which is first attested 1510s. Related: Framed; framing.

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diagnostic (adj.)

1620s, "of or pertaining to diagnosis," also as a noun, "a symptom of value in diagnosis," from Greek diagnōstikos "able to distinguish," from diagnōstos, verbal adjective from diagignōskein "to discern, distinguish," literally "to know thoroughly" or "know apart (from another)," from dia "between" (see dia-) + gignōskein "to learn, to come to know," from PIE root *gno- "to know." Related: Diagnostics.

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frame (n.)

c. 1200, "profit, benefit, advancement;" mid-13c. "a structure composed according to a plan," from frame (v.) and in part from Scandinavian cognates (Old Norse frami "advancement"). In late 14c. it also meant "the rack."

Meaning "sustaining parts of a structure fitted together" is from c. 1400. Meaning "enclosing border" of any kind is from c. 1600; specifically "border or case for a picture or pane of glass" from 1660s. The meaning "human body" is from 1590s. Of bicycles, from 1871; of motor cars, from 1900. Meaning "separate picture in a series from a film" is from 1916. From 1660s in the meaning "particular state" (as in Frame of mind, 1711). Frame of reference is 1897, from mechanics and graphing; the figurative sense is attested from 1924.

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frame (adj.)

(of buildings), "made of wood," 1790, American English, from frame (n.).

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reframe (v.)

also re-frame, "frame or put together again, fashion anew," 1580s, from re- "again" + frame (v.). Related: Reframed; reframing.

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work-up (n.)

"diagnostic examination of a patient," 1961, from the verbal phrase; see work (v.) + up (adv.).

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chassis (n.)

"base frame of an automobile," 1903, American English; earlier "sliding frame or carriage-base for a large gun" (1869), "window frame" (1660s), from French châssis "frame," Old French chassiz (13c.) "frame, framework, setting," from chasse "case, box, eye socket, snail's shell, setting (of a jewel)," from Latin capsa "box, case" (see case (n.2)) + French -is, collective suffix for a number of parts taken together. Compare sash (n.2).

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mainframe (n.)

"central processor of a computer system," 1964, from main (adj.) + frame (n.).

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grating (n.)

"partition or frame of parallel crossing bars," 1620s, from grate (n.).

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