Etymology
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diadem (n.)

c. 1300, diademe, "aureole of a martyr or confessor;" mid-14c., "a crown, anything worn on the head as a mark of royalty," from Old French diademe and directly from Latin diadema "cloth band worn around the head as a sign of royalty," from Greek diadema "the headband worn by Persian kings and adopted by Alexander the Great and his successors," from diadein "to bind across," from dia "across" or "through" (see dia-) + dein "to bind," which is related to desmos "band," from PIE root *dē- "to bind." Related: Diademed.

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asyndeton (n.)

"figure of speech consisting of omission of conjunctions," 1580s, from Latin, from Greek asyndeton, neuter of asyndetos "unconnected," from a- "not, without" (see a- (3)) + syndetos, from syndein "to bind together," from syn- "together" (see syn-) + dein "to bind," related to desmos "band," from PIE root *dē- "to bind" (see diadem).

"I pitied thee, Took pains to make thee speak, taught thee each hour One thing or other." ["The Tempest"]
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Taj Mahal (n.)

mausoleum at Agra, India, built by Shah Jahan for his favorite wife, from Persian, perhaps "the best of buildings," with second element, mahal, from Urdu mahall "private apartments; summer house or palace," from Arabic halla "to lodge." But some authorities hold that the name of the mausoleum is a corruption of the name of the woman interred in it, Mumtaz (in Persian, literally "chosen one") Mahal, who died in 1631. Persian taj is literally "crown, diadem, ornamental headdress," but here denoting an object of distinguished excellence. Figurative use of Taj Mahal in English as a name denoting anything surpassing or excellent is attested from 1895.

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