Etymology
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determined (adj.)

late 14c., "bound, limited, restricted;" 1560s, "decided," past-participle adjective from determine. Meaning "characterized by resolution" is from c. 1600, of actions; 1772, of persons. The earlier adjective in this sense was determinate. To be determined "have come to a decision, be resolved" is from 1510s. Related: Determinedly.

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hell-bent (adj.)
also hellbent, "recklessly determined," 1824, U.S., originally slang, from hell + bent (adj.).
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predetermination (n.)

"state of being previously determined; act of predetermining," 1630s; see predetermine + noun ending -ation.

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resolved (adj.)

of persons, "determined, resolute, firm," 1510s, past-participle adjective from resolve (v.). Related: Resolvedly.

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preset 

also pre-set, 1934 (adj.) "decided or determined in advance;" 1946 (v.); from pre- "before" + set (adj.).

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pushy (adj.)

"unpleasantly forward or aggressive," 1894 of persons (1891 of a cow), from push (n.) in the "determined effort to get on" sense + -y (2). Related: Pushily; pushiness.

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imperious (adj.)

1540s, "of a dominating character," from Latin imperiosus "commanding, mighty, powerful," from imperium "empire, command" (see empire). Formerly also emperious. Meaning "imperial" is from 1580s. Related: Imperiously; imperiousness.

Imperious applies to the spirit or manner of the person ruling or giving a command, and of rule in general; imperative, to the nature of a command. An imperious person is determined to have his will obeyed; imperious rule is characterized by the haughty, overbearing, and determined nature of the ruler. [Century Dictionary]
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headstrong (adj.)
"determined to have one's way," late 14c., from head (n.) + strong. Compare Old English heafodbald "impudent," literally "head-bold." Strongheaded is attested from c. 1600.
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push (n.)

1560s, "a driving or impelling thrust," from push (v.). By 1590s as "a vigorous attempt." By 1803 as "a determined advance, a pushing forward." The sense of "persevering enterprise, a determined effort to get on" especially if inconsiderate of others is by 1855. Phrase when push comes to shove "when action must back up threats" is by 1936. An earlier Middle English noun push "a pustule, pimple, boil" probably is from pus by influence of push.

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fatalist (n.)
1640s, adherent of the philosophical doctrine that all things are determined by fate; from fatal + -ist. General sense of "one who accepts every condition and event as inevitable" is from 1734.
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