Etymology
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deposit (n.)

1620s, "state of being placed in safe-keeping," from Latin depositum, from deponere (see deposit (v.)). From 1660s as "that which is laid or thrown down." Geological sense is from 1781; financial sense "money lodged in a bank for safety or convenience" is from 1737. Middle English had depost "thing entrusted for safe-keeping" (late 14c.).

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deposit (v.)

1620s, "place in the hands of another as a pledge for a contract," from Latin depositus, past participle of deponere "lay aside, put down, deposit," also used of births and bets, from de "away" (see de-) + ponere "to put, place" (past participle positus; see position (n.)). From 1650s as "lay away for safe-keeping;" from 1749 as "lay down, place, put." Related: Deposited; depositing.

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safe-deposit (adj.)

"providing safe storage for valuables of any kind," by 1864; see safe (adj.) + deposit (n.).

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depositor (n.)

1560s, "one who deposes" (obsolete in this sense); 1620s, "one who makes a deposit, one who places something in charge of another," agent noun in Latin form from deposit (v.).

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depository (n.)

"place where things are lodged for safe-keeping," 1750, from Medieval Latin depositorium, from deposit-, past-participle stem of Latin deponere (see deposit (v.)) + -orium (see -ory).

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deposition (n.)

late 14c., deposicion, "dethronement, a putting down of a person from dignity, office, or authority," from Old French deposicion (12c.), from Latin depositionem (nominative depositio), noun of action from past-participle stem of deponere "to lay aside" (see deposit (v.)).

Meaning "a statement or statements made in court under oath" is from early 15c. Meaning "action of depositing" is from 1590s. Properly, deposition belongs to deposit, but deposit and depose have become inextricably confused and English deposition partakes of senses belonging to both.

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depot (n.)

1795, "warehouse or storehouse for receiving goods for storage, sale, or transfer," from French dépôt "a deposit, place of deposit," from Old French depost "a deposit or pledge," from Latin depositum "a deposit," noun use of neuter past participle of deponere "lay aside, put down," from de "away" (see de-) + ponere "to put, place" (past participle positus; see position (n.)).

Military sense of "fort where stores, ammunition, etc. are deposited" is from 1798; meaning "railway station, building for accommodation and shelter of passengers and the receipt and transfer of freight" is attested by 1842, American English.

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payphone (n.)

also pay-phone, "telephone requiring a coin deposit to operate," 1906, from pay (v.) + phone (n.).

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esker (n.)
"deposit left by a glacial stream," 1852, from Irish eiscir "ridge of gravel."
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pawnbroker (n.)

"one licensed to lend money at interest on pledge or deposit of goods," 1680s, from pawn (n.1) + broker (n.).

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