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dentistry (n.)

"the art or profession of a dentist," 1803; see dentist + -ry.

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orthodontics (n.)

"orthodontia, the branch of dentistry concerned with the treatment of irregularities of the teeth and jaws," 1909, from orthodontic (adj.); also see -ics.

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filling (n.)
c. 1400, "that which fills or fills up," verbal noun from fill (v.). Dentistry sense is from 1848. Filling station attested by 1915.
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periodontics (n.)

"the branch of dentistry concerned with the periodontal tissue and its disorders," 1948, from periodontia "periodontal membrane" (1914; see periodontal) + -ics. Periodontic (adj.) is attested by 1889.

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orthodontia (n.)

"the branch of dentistry concerned with the treatment of irregularities of the teeth and jaws," 1849, from ortho- "straight, regular" + Greek odon (genitive odontos) "tooth" (from PIE root *dent- "tooth") + abstract noun ending -ia.

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occlusion (n.)

"act or fact of being stopped up," 1640s, from Medieval Latin occlusionem (nominative occlusio), noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin occludere (see occlude). Dentistry sense "position of the two sets of teeth relative to each other when the mouth is closed" is from 1880.

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dental (adj.)

1590s, "of or pertaining to teeth," from French dental "of teeth" or Medieval Latin dentalis, from Latin dens (genitive dentis) "tooth" (from PIE root *dent- "tooth"). As "connected with or used in dentistry," 1826. In grammar, "formed or pronounced at or near the front upper teeth, with the tip or front of the tongue," 1590s. As a noun, "sound formed by placing the end of the tongue against or near the upper teeth," 1794. Related: Dentally; dentality.

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barber (n.)

"one whose occupation is to shave the beard and cut and dress the hair," c. 1300, from Anglo-French barbour (attested as a surname from early 13c.), from Old French barbeor, barbieor (13c., Modern French barbier, which has a more restricted sense than the English word), from Vulgar Latin *barbatorem, from Latin barba "beard" (see barb (n.)).

Originally also regular practitioners of minor surgery, they were restricted to hair-cutting, blood-letting, and dentistry under Henry VIII. The barber's pole (1680s) is in imitation of the ribbon used to bind the arm of one who has been bled.

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