Etymology
Advertisement
denomination (n.)

late 14c., denominacioun, "a naming, act of giving a name to," from Old French denominacion "nominating, naming," from Latin denominationem (nominative denominatio) "a calling by anything other than the proper name, metonymy," noun of action from past-participle stem of denominare "to name," from de- "completely" (see de-) + nominare "to name," from nomen "name" (from PIE root *no-men- "name").

From mid-15c. as "a class name, a collective designation," of things; of persons, "a society or collection of individuals," 1660s. From the first comes the monetary sense (1650s) from the second the meaning "religious sect" (1716).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
denominational (adj.)

"pertaining to a religious denomination or sect," 1838; see denomination + -al (1). Related: Denominationalism "tendency to divide into sects or denominations, inclination to emphasize distinguishing characteristics as opposed to general principles" (1845).

Related entries & more 
non-denominational (adj.)

also nondenominational, "of no denomination," 1893, from non- + denominational.

Related entries & more 
shinplaster (n.)
also shin-plaster, piece of paper soaked in vinegar and used to treat sore legs, from shin (n.) + plaster (n.). In U.S. history, jocularly or as a term of abuse for "devalued low-denomination paper currency" (1824).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Congregationalist (n.)

1690s, one of the Christian denomination built on Congregationalism (1716), the system of church government based on autonomy of the individual congregations. See congregational + -ist.

Related entries & more 
Adventist (n.)
"one of a religious denomination that believes in or looks for the early second coming of Christ to establish a personal reign," 1843; see advent + -ist. In Church Latin adventus was applied to the coming of the Savior, both the first or the anticipated second, hence Adventist was applied to millenarian sects, especially and originally the Millerites (U.S.). By the end of the 19c. there were three main divisions of them; the Seventh-Day Adventists so called for their observation of Saturday as the Sabbath.
Related entries & more 
appellation (n.)

"designation, name given to a person, thing, or class," mid-15c., from Old French apelacion "name, denomination" (12c.), from Latin appellationem (nominative appellatio) "an addressing, accosting; an appeal; a name, title," noun of action from past-participle stem of appellare "address, appeal to, name" (see appeal (v.)).

An appellation is a descriptive and therefore specific term, as Saint Louis; John's appellation was the Baptist; George Washington has the appellation of Father of his Country. A title is an official or honorary appellation, as reverend, bishop, doctor, colonel, duke. [Century Dictionary]
Related entries & more 
Nazarene (n.)

c. 1200, "holy man;" early 13c., "a native or resident of Nazareth," childhood home of Jesus, from Late Latin Nazarenus, from Greek Nazarenos, from Hebrew Natzerath. As an adjective from late 13c. As "a follower of Jesus" from late 14c. In Talmudic Hebrew notzri, literally "of Nazareth," was used dismissively for "a Christian;" likewise Arabic Nasrani (plural Nasara). In Christian use, however, it can be a nickname for Jesus, or refer to an early Jewish Christian sect (1680s in English), or, in modern use, to a member of the Church of the Nazarene, a U.S.-based Protestant denomination (1898 in this sense).

Related entries & more 
methodist (n.)

1590s, "one who is characterized by strict adherence to method," from method + -ist. With a capital M-, it refers to the Protestant religious denomination founded 1729 at Oxford University by John and Charles Wesley. The name had been used at least since 1686 for various new methods of worship; it was applied to the Wesleys by their fellow-students at Oxford for their methodical habits in study and religious life. Johnson (1755) describes them as "One of a new kind of puritans lately arisen, so called from their profession to live by rules and in constant method." Related: Methodism.

Related entries & more