Etymology
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democratic (adj.)

c. 1600, "of the nature of or characterized by democracy; pertaining to democracy," from French démocratique, from Medieval Latin democraticus, from Greek demokratikos "of or for democracy; favoring democracy," from demokratia "popular government" (see democracy). Earlier was democratian (1570s), democratical (1580s). Related: Democratically.

As a political faction name, from 1790 in reference to France. U.S. political usage (with a capital D) attested from c. 1800. The party originally was the Anti-Federal party, then the Democratic-Republican (Democratic for short). It formed among those opposed to extensive powers for the U.S. federal government. The name of the party was not formally shortened to Democratic until 1829. Democratic socialism is attested from 1849.

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leadership (n.)
1821, "position of a leader, command," from leader + -ship. Sense extended by late 19c. to "characteristics necessary to be a leader, capacity to lead."
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democratize (v.)

1798 (transitive) "make popular or common, bring to a common level, render democratic;" 1840 (intransitive) "become democratic," from French démocratiser, noted as one of the neologisms of the Revolution, from démocratie (see democracy). Greek demokratizein meant "to be on the democratic side."

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demagoguery (n.)

1855, "actions characteristic of a demagogue;" see demagogue + -ery. Demagogy in the same sense is from 1650s, from Greek demagogia "leadership of the people." Demagogism is by 1824.

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SCLC (n.)
initialism (acronym) of Southern Christian Leadership Conference, founded 1957 by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Bayard Rustin, and others.
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sabbat (n.)

"witches' sabbath," a midnight meeting supposed to have been held annually by demons, sorcerers, and witches under the leadership of Satan, to celebrate their orgies, 1650s, a special application of the French form of Sabbath (q.v.).

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Dixiecrat (n.)

in U.S. politics, "Democratic politician from the South who seceded from the party over the extension of civil rights," 1948, from Dixie + ending from Democrat.

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NASCAR 

acronym for National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing, U.S. auto racing promotion group founded 1948 in Daytona Beach, Florida. NASCAR dad in U.S. political parlance, "small-town, often Southern white man who abandons traditional Democratic leanings to vote Republican at least once every four years" was coined 2003 by Democratic pollster Celinda Lake.

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democratization (n.)

"action or process of becoming democratic; act of rendering democratic," 1860; see democratize + -ation.

We teach the population at the cheapest possible rate; and the aim all the democratization (if we may use the word) of literature proposes to itself in this country, is to store the minds of the many, of the anonymous multitude, with a large portion of valuable, because practically useful, facts. [Meliora, vol. ii, no. 6, 1860]
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Ostmark (n.)

name used in the West for the currency of the former German Democratic Republic (East Germany), 1948, from German Ost "east" (see east) + Mark, name of a unit of currency (see mark (n.2)).

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