Etymology
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delicious (adj.)
Origin and meaning of delicious

c. 1300, "delightful to the senses, pleasing in the highest degree" (implied in deliciously), from Old French delicios (Modern French délicieux), from Late Latin deliciosus "delicious, delicate," from Latin delicia (plural deliciae) "a delight, allurement, charm," from delicere "to allure, entice," from de- "away" (see de-) + lacere "to lure, entice," which is of uncertain origin.

Especially, but not exclusively, of taste. Related: Deliciously. As a name of a type of apple, attested from 1903, first grown by Jesse Hiatt of Iowa, U.S.A. Colloquial shortening delish is attested from 1920.

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bootylicious (adj.)
by 1998, hip-hop slang, from booty + ending from delicious.
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deliciousness (n.)

"delightfulness, quality of being delicious," late 14c., from delicious + -ness.

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babelicious (adj.)
1991, from babe in the "attractive young woman" sense + ending from delicious.
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delight (v.)
Origin and meaning of delight

c. 1200, deliten, intransitive, "to have or take great pleasure;" c. 1300, transitive, "to affect with great pleasure," from Old French delitier "please greatly, charm," from Latin delectare "to allure, delight, charm, please," frequentative of delicere "entice" (see delicious). Related: Delighted; delighting.

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delectable (adj.)

c. 1400, "delightful to one of the senses, highly pleasing," from Old French delectable delitable and directly from Latin delectabilis "delightful," from delectare "to allure, delight, charm, please," frequentative of delicere "entice" (see delicious). The earlier form in English was delitable (late 13c.). Since c. 1700 "rarer, more or less affected or humorous, and restricted to the lighter kinds of pleasure" [OED]. Related: Delectably.

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delectation (n.)

mid-14c., delectacioun, "great pleasure, particularly of the senses" (but in Middle English also spiritual and intellectual), from Old French delectation "enjoyment" (12c.) and directly from Latin delectationem (nominative delectatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of delectare "to allure, delight, charm, please," frequentative of delicere "entice" (see delicious). Also in theology "the second stage of sin, pleasure in contemplating sin, desire for sin" (mid-15c.).

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delight (n.)
Origin and meaning of delight

c. 1200, delit, "high degree of pleasure or satisfaction," also "that which gives great pleasure," from Old French delit "pleasure, delight, sexual desire," from delitier "please greatly, charm," from Latin delectare "to allure, delight, charm, please," frequentative of delicere "entice" (see delicious). Spelled delite until 16c.; the modern unetymological form is by influence of light, flight, etc.

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dilettante (n.)

1733, "an admirer of a fine art, literature, science, etc., one who cultivates an art or literature casually and for amusement," a borrowing of Italian dilettante "lover of music or painting," from dilettare "to delight," from Latin delectare "to allure, delight, charm, please," frequentative of delicere "entice" (see delicious). Originally without negative connotation, "devoted amateur;" the pejorative sense "superficial and affected dabbler" emerged late 18c. by contrast with professional.

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delicate (adj.)
Origin and meaning of delicate

late 14c., of persons, "self-indulgent, loving ease;" also "sensitive, easily hurt, feeble;" of things, "delightful," from Latin delicatus "alluring, delightful, dainty," also "addicted to pleasure, luxurious, effeminate," in Medieval Latin "fine, slender;" related to deliciae "pleasure, delight, luxury," and delicere "to allure, entice," from de "away" (see de-) + lacere "to lure, entice," which is of uncertain origin. Compare delicious, delectable, delight.

Meaning "so fine or tender as to be easily broken" is recorded from 1560s. Meaning "requiring nice and skillful handling" is by 1742. Sense of "exquisitely adjusted in construction" is from 1756. Related: Delicateness.

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