Etymology
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food (n.)

Middle English foode, fode, from Old English foda "food, nourishment; fuel," also figurative, from Proto-Germanic *fodon (source also of Swedish föda, Danish föde, Gothic fodeins), from Germanic *fod- "food," from PIE *pat-, extended form of root *pa- "to feed."

Food chain is by 1915. Food poisoning attested by 1864; food processor in the kitchen appliance sense from 1973; food stamp (n.) is from 1962.

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delicatessen (n.)

1877, "delicacies, articles of fine food," American English, from German delikatessen, plural of delikatesse "a delicacy, fine food," from French délicatesse (1560s), from délicat "fine," from Latin delicatus "alluring, delightful, dainty" (see delicate). As a store where such things are sold, 1901, short for delicatessen shop.

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fish-food (n.)

 1863, "food for (pet or hobby) fish;" 1860, "fish as food for humans;" from fish (n.) + food

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seafood (n.)
"food obtained from the sea," 1836, American English, from sea + food.
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FDA 
U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 1930, shortened from Food, Drug, and Insecticide Administration.
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foodstuff (n.)
"substance or material suitable for food," 1870, from food + stuff (n.). Related: Foodstuffs.
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trophic (adj.)
"of or pertaining to nutrition, food, or nourishment," 1856, from Greek trophikos, from trophe "nourishment, food" (see -trophy).
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sitophobia (n.)
"morbid aversion to food" (or certain foods), 1882, from Greek sitos "wheat, corn, meal; food," of unknown origin, + -phobia. Related: Sitophobe; sitophobic.
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repast (n.)

late 14c., repaste, "a meal, a feast; food, nourishment, act of taking food," from Old French repast (Modern French repas) "a meal, food," from Late Latin repastus "meal" (also source of Spanish repasto), noun use of past participle of repascere "to feed again," from re- "repeatedly" (see re-) + Latin pascere "to graze" (from PIE root *pa- "to feed"). The verb, "refresh oneself with food" (intransitive), is from late 15c.

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