Etymology
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deliberate (adj.)

early 15c., "done with careful consideration," from Latin deliberatus "resolved upon, determined," past participle of deliberare "consider carefully, consult," literally "weigh well," from de, here probably "entirely" (see de-) + -liberare, altered (probably by influence of liberare "to free, liberate") from librare "to balance, make level," from libra "pair of scales, a balance" (see Libra). Meaning "characterized by slowness in decision, consciously unhurried" is attested by 1590s. Related: Deliberateness.

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deliberate (v.)

1540s, "weigh in the mind, consider carefully;" 1550s, "discuss and examine the reasons for or against," from Latin deliberatus, past participle of deliberare "consider carefully, consult," literally "weigh well," from de, here probably "entirely" (see de-) + -liberare, altered (probably by influence of liberare "to free, liberate") from librare "to balance, make level," from libra "pair of scales, a balance" (see Libra). Related: Deliberated; deliberating. The earlier form of the verb in English was deliberen (late 14c.), from Old French deliberer and directly from Latin deliberare.

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deliberately (adv.)

late 15c., "with due consideration, with a set purpose," from deliberate (adj.) + -ly (2).

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foot-dragging (n.)
"deliberate slowness," 1966, from foot (n.) + present-participle adjective from drag (v.).
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precious (n.)

"beloved or dear person or object," 1706, from precious (adj.). Since the "Lord of the Rings" movies, often with deliberate echoes of Tolkien.

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brutalism (n.)
1803, "the practice or exercise of brutality," from brutal + -ism. In the arts, 1953 in reference to a style characterized by deliberate crudity and exposed structure. Brutalist is from 1934 in literature.
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smoke-screen (n.)
1915, as a form of military camouflage, from smoke (n.1) + screen (n.); 1926 in the figurative sense. The association of smoke with "deception, deliberate obscurity" dates back to at least 1560s.
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depreciation (n.)

1767, "a lowering of value" (originally of currency), noun of action from depreciate. Sense of "a belittling, deliberate underestimation of the merits of a person, action, or thing" is from 1790. Meaning "loss of value of a durable good by age or wear" is from 1900.

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ratiocinate (v.)

"to reason, from two judgments to infer a third," 1640s, from Latin ratiocinatus, past participle of ratiocinari "to reckon, compute, calculate; to deliberate, meditate; to reason, argue, infer" (see ratiocination). "Now rare in serious use" [OED]. Related: Ratiocinant; ratiocinative; ratiocinatory.

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Medea 

famous sorceress, daughter of the king of Colchis, from Latin Medea, from Greek Mēdeia, literally "cunning," related to mēdomai "to deliberate, estimate, contrive, decide," mēdein "to protect, rule over," from PIE root *med- "take appropriate measures."

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