Etymology
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orthopedist (n.)

"one skilled in curing natural deformities in the human body," 1853, from orthopedy (1840), from French orthopédie (18c.); see orthopedic + -ist.

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orthopedics (n.)

"act of curing or remedying deformities in the bodies of children or in persons generally," 1853, from orthopedic. Also see -ics. The form orthopaedy is attested from 1840, from French.

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orthopedic (adj.)

"relating to or concerned with the cure of bodily deformities in children or in persons generally," 1840, from French orthopédique, from orthopédie, coined by French physician Nicholas Andry (1658-1742), from Greek orthos "straight, correct" (see ortho-) + paideia "rearing of children," from pais (genitive paidos) "child" (see pedo-).

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varus (n.)

foot deformity in which the feet are extroverted, so that the inner ankle rests on the ground, while the sole of the foot is more or less turned outwards, 1800, from Latin varus "bent, bent outwards, turned awry, crooked," specifically "with legs bent inward, knock-kneed," a word of uncertain origin (see vary).

If the original meaning was 'with the legs opened', varus might be compared with vanus and vastus, and reflect *wa-ro- 'going apart, letting go'. In any case, none of the other etymologies proposed seems plausible. [de Vaan]

The use of classical varus and valgus, which denoted deformities of the legs, in modern medicine to describe deformities of the feet, was criticized by learned writers (see "Edinburgh Medical and Surgical Journal," July 1838).

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