Etymology
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determinate (adj.)

late 14c., "having defined limits, definite, defined, specific," from Latin determinatus, past participle of determinare "to enclose, bound, set limits to" (see determine). Also "fixed in mind" (mid-15c.).

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indeterminable (adj.)
late 15c., from Late Latin indeterminabilis "that cannot be defined," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + determinabilis "that can be defined," from determinare "to enclose, bound, set limits to" (see determine). Related: Indeterminably.
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definable (adj.)

"capable of being defined or explained," 1650s; see define + -able. Related: Definably; definability.

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Mideast (n.)

"Middle East," attested from 1944 in reference to western Asia. Loosely defined (compare Middle East).

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definite (adj.)

c. 1500, "fixed, established; certain, precise;" 1550s, "having fixed limits," from Latin definitus "defined, bounded, limited," past participle of definire "to limit, determine, explain," from de "completely" (see de-) + finire "to bound, limit," from finis "boundary, end" (see finish (v.)). From 1727 in grammar, "defining, limiting." Definite means "defined, clear, precise, unmistakable;" definitive means "having the character of finality." Related: Definiteness.

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erotomania (n.)
1813, defined then as "Desperate love; sentimentalism producing morbid feelings," from combining form of erotic + mania.
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ho-de-ho (interj.)
1932, defined in the "Oxford English Dictionary" as "An exclamation, used as the appropriate response to HI-DE-HI."
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ontic (adj.)

a word in philosophy, variously defined but in general "pertaining to the existence of structure in an entity," 1949, from onto- + -ic.

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dord (n.)

a ghost word printed in the 1934 "Webster's New International Dictionary" and defined as a noun used by physicists and chemists, meaning "density." In sorting out and separating abbreviations from words in preparing the dictionary's second edition, a card marked "D or d" meaning "density" somehow migrated from the "abbreviations" stack to the "words" stack. The "D or d" entry ended up being typeset as a word, dord, and defined as a synonym for density. The mistake was discovered in 1939.

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chrono- 
before vowels chron-, word-forming element meaning "time," from Latinized form of Greek khronos "time, a defined time, a lifetime, a season, a while," which is of uncertain origin.
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