Etymology
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Graves' disease 

"exophthalmic goiter," 1862, named for Irish physician Robert James Graves (1796-1853), who first recognized the disease in 1835. The surname probably is from Old Norse greifi "steward," corresponding to Old English gerefa (see reeve).

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Parkinson's disease 

form of paralysis, 1877, from French maladie de Parkinson (1876), named for English physician James Parkinson (1755-1824), who described it (1817) under the names shaking palsy and paralysis agitans.

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Hodgkin's disease 

1877, named for English pathologist Dr. Thomas Hodgkin (1798-1866) who first described it in 1832.

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Hansen's disease (n.)

1938, named for Norwegian physician Gerhard Henrik Armauer Hansen (1841-1912) who in 1871 discovered the bacillus that causes it.

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Alzheimer's disease (n.)

senium præcox, 1912, the title of article by S.C. Fuller published in "Journal of Nervous and Mental Diseases;" named for German neurologist Alois Alzheimer (1864-1915). The disease name was not common before 1970s; shortened form Alzheimer's is recorded from 1954. The surname is from the place name Alzheim, literally "Old Hamlet."

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CDC 

abbreviation of Centers for Disease Control, renamed 1970 from earlier U.S. federal health lab, originally Communicable Diseases Center (1946). Since 1992, full name is Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but the usual initialism (acronym) remains CDC.

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Lassa 

1970 in reference to a febrile disease of tropical Africa, from Lassa, name of a village in northeastern Nigeria.

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Huntington's chorea 

also Huntington's disease, 1889, named for U.S. neurologist George Huntington (1851-1916), who described it in 1872.

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Bahamas 

islands discovered by Columbus in 1492, settled by English in 1648, long after the native population had been wiped out by disease or carried off into slavery; the name is said to be from Spanish baja mar "low sea," in reference to the shallow water here, but more likely represents a local name, Guanahani, the origin of which had been lost and the meaning forgotten.

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Scythian (n.)

one of an ancient nomadic race living on the steppes of southern Russia, 1540s, from Latin Scythia, from Greek Skythia, name anciently given to the region along the north coast of the Black Sea and extending in definitely north, from Skythes "a Scythian," said to be from an Indo-European root meaning "shepherd" [Room]. The earlier noun was Scyth (late 14c.). As an adjective from 1560s, "pertaining to Scythia or the Scythians." Herodotus is responsible for Scythian disease or Scythian insanity.

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