Etymology
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debt (n.)

c. 1300, dette, "anything owed or due from one person to another, a liability or obligation to pay or render something to another," from Old French dete, from Latin debitum "thing owed," neuter past participle of debere "to owe," originally, "keep something away from someone," from de "away" (see de-) + habere "to have" (from PIE root *ghabh- "to give or receive").

Meaning "state of being under obligation to make payment" is from mid-14c. Restored spelling after c. 1400. In Middle English, debt of the body (mid-14c.) was "that which spouses owe to each other, sexual intercourse."

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enslave (v.)

"make a slave of, reduce to slavery or bondage," 1640s, from en- (1) "make, make into" + slave (n.). Related: Enslaved; enslaving.

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enslavement (n.)

"act of enslaving; state of being enslaved, slavery, bondage, servitude," 1690s, from enslave + -ment.

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payment (n.)

late 14c., paiement, "action of paying, repayment of a debt; amount due as a payment," from Old French paiement (13c.), from paiier (see pay (v.)). Meaning "thing or sum of money given in discharge of a debt" is from mid-15c.

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indebted (adj.)

late 14c., endetted "owing money, liable for borrowed money," past participle of endetten "to indebt, oblige," from Old French endeter "to involve in debt, run into debt," from en- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + dete "debt" (see debt). Figurative sense of "under obligation for favors or services" first attested 1560s. Spelling re-Latinized in English from 16c. The verb indebt is now rare or obsolete. Related: Indebtedness. Latin indebitus meant "not owed, not due."

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disenthrall (v.)

"liberate from bondage or servitude, free from what holds in mental or physical subjection," 1640s, from dis- + enthrall. Related: Disenthralled; disenthralling; disenthrallment.

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acquittal (n.)

early 15c., aquitaille, "payment of debt or retribution;" see acquit + -al (2). Sense of "a release from debt or obligation" is from mid-15c.; that of "freeing from charge or offense" (by legal process) is from 1530s.

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re-enslave (v.)

"cast again into bondage," 1650s, from re- "back, again" + enslave. Related: Re-enslaved; re-enslaving; re-enslavement.

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enthrall (v.)

also enthral "to hold in mental or moral bondage," 1570s, from en- (1) "make, put in" + thrall (n.). Literal sense (1610s) is rare in English. Related: Enthralled; enthralling.

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