Etymology
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debate (n.)

early 14c., "a quarrel, dispute, disagreement" (now archaic), from Old French debat, from debatre(see debate (v.)). Sense of "contention by argument" is from late 14c., that of "a formal dispute, a debating contest, interchange of arguments in a somewhat formal manner" is perhaps from early 15c.

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debate (v.)

late 14c., "to quarrel, dispute," also "to combat, fight, make war" (senses now archaic), also "discuss, deliberate upon the pros and cons of," from Old French debatre (13c., Modern French débattre), originally "to fight," from de- "down, completely" (see de-) + batre "to beat," from Latin battuere "beat" (see batter (v.)).

And he began for to debate; He smote þe porter. ["Robert of Sicily," c. 1500]

Transitive sense of "to contend about in argument" is from mid-15c.; that of "argue for or against in public" is from 1520s. Related: Debated; debating.

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debatable (adj.)

1530s, "open to debate or controversy, subject to dispute," from Old French debatable (Modern French débattable), from debatre (see debate (v.)). Earliest references were to lands claimed by two nations (especially the region between England and Scotland, known in mid-15c. as Batable Landez); general sense is from 1580s.

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settler (n.)
1590s, "a thing that settles" (a debate, etc.); agent noun from settle (v.). Meaning "a person who moves into a new country" is from 1690s.
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pleading (n.)

mid-14c., "debate, dispute;" late 14c., "litigation, the carrying on of a suit at court," verbal noun from plead (v.). Meaning "supplication, intercession" is from early 15c.

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environmentalism (n.)
1923, as a psychological theory (in the nature vs. nurture debate), from environmental + -ism. The ecological sense is from 1972. Related: Environmentalist (n.), 1916 in the psychological sense, 1970 in the ecological sense.
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discuss (v.)

late 14c., discussen, "to examine, investigate," from Latin discuss-, past participle stem of discutere "to dash to pieces, agitate, strike or shake apart," in Late Latin and Medieval Latin also "to discuss, examine, investigate," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + quatere "to shake" (see quash).

Meaning "examine by argument, debate," the usual modern sense, is from mid-15c. (implied in discussing). Sense evolution in Latin appears to have been from "smash apart" to "scatter, disperse," then in post-classical times (via the mental process involved) to "investigate, examine," then to "debate." Related: Discussed.

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siding (n.)
c. 1600, "a taking of sides in a conflict or debate," verbal noun from side. First attested 1825 in the railroad sense; 1829, American English, in the architectural sense of "boarding on the sides of a building."
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inferiority (n.)

"state of being inferior," 1590s, probably from Medieval Latin *inferioritas; see inferior + -ity. Inferiority complex first attested 1919.

The surrender of life is nothing to sinking down into acknowledgment of inferiority. [John C. Calhoun, Senate debate, Feb. 19, 1847]
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controvert (v.)

c. 1600, "dispute (something), oppose by argument" (a sense now obsolete); 1610s, "to make the subject of verbal contention, debate, discuss; contend against (someone) in argument," probably a back-formation from controversy. Related: Controverted; controverting; controvertible.

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