Etymology
Advertisement
dealer (n.)

Old English dælere "divider, distributor; agent, negotiator," agent noun from deal (v.). Meaning "player who passes out the cards in a game" is from c. 1600; meaning "one whose business is to buy and sell merchandise" is from 1610s. Meaning "purveyor of illegal drugs" is recorded by 1920.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
dealership (n.)

"the business of an authorized trader," 1916, from dealer + -ship.

Related entries & more 
laceman (n.)
dealer in laces, 1660s, from lace (n.) + man.
Related entries & more 
iceman (n.)
"dealer in ice," 1844, from ice (n.) + man (n.).
Related entries & more 
junkman (n.)
"dealer in junk," 1872, from junk (n.1) + man (n.).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
plumassier (n.)

"dealer in ornamental feathers, one who prepares plumes for ornamental purposes," 1590s, from French plumassier, from plumasse "plume of feather," from plume (see plume (n.)). Earlier was plumer "dealer in feathers" (late 13c.).

Related entries & more 
maltster (n.)

"maker of or dealer in malt," early 14c. (late 13c. as a surname), from malt + -ster.

Related entries & more 
merchandizer (n.)

also merchandiser, "a dealer in merchandise," 1590s, agent noun from merchandize (v.).

Related entries & more 
bibliopole (n.)

"bookseller," 1775, from Latin bibliopola, from Greek bibliopōlēs "bookseller," from biblion "book" (see biblio-) + pōlēs "merchant, seller," from pōlein "to sell" (from PIE root *pel- (4) "to sell"). Especially a dealer in rare or curious books. French has bouquinist "a dealer in second-hand books of little value."

Related entries & more 
cozen (v.)

"to cheat, defraud," 1560s, of uncertain origin; perhaps from French cousiner "cheat on pretext of being a cousin;" or from Middle English cosyn "fraud, trickery" (mid-15c.), which is perhaps related to Old French coçon "dealer, merchant, trader," from Latin cocionem "horse dealer." Related: Cozened; cozening; cozenage.

Related entries & more