Etymology
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daughter (n.)

Middle English doughter, from Old English dohtor "female child considered with reference to her parents," from Proto-Germanic *dokhter, earlier *dhutēr (source also of Old Saxon dohtar, Old Norse dóttir, Old Frisian and Dutch dochter, German Tochter, Gothic dauhtar), from PIE *dhugheter (source also of Sanskrit duhitar-, Avestan dugeda-, Armenian dustr, Old Church Slavonic dušti, Lithuanian duktė, Greek thygater). The common Indo-European word, lost in Celtic and Latin (Latin filia "daughter" is fem. of filius "son").

The modern spelling evolved 16c. in southern England. In late Old English also "woman viewed in some analogous relationship" (to her native country, church, culture, etc.). From c. 1200 of anything regarded as feminine, considered with respect to its source. Daughter-in-law is attested from late 14c. (see in-law). Related: Daughterly.

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step-daughter (n.)
Old English stepdohtor; see step- + daughter (n.). Similar formation in German Stieftochter.
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god-daughter (n.)
"female godchild, girl one sponsors at her baptism," mid-13c., from god + daughter, modifying or replacing Old English goddohtor.
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filicide (n.)
1660s, "action of killing a son or daughter," from Latin filius/filia "son/daughter" (see filial) + -cide "a killing." Meaning "one who kills a son or daughter" is from 1823. Related: Filicidal.
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Bathsheba 
Biblical wife of King David, mother of Solomon, from Hebrew Bathshebha, literally "daughter of the oath," from bath "daughter."
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Ino 
Greek sea-goddess, daughter of Cadmus and Hermione.
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Electra 

also called Laodice, a daughter of Agamemnon and Clytaemnestra, the accomplice of her brother Orestes in the murder of their mother, from Greek Ēlektra, literally "shining, bright," related to ēlektōr "the beaming sun" and perhaps to ēlektron "amber." Especially in psychological Electra complex (1913, Jung) in reference to a daughter who feels attraction toward her father and hostility to her mother. Also the name of a daughter of Atlas, and as such a name of one of the Pleiades.

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filiation (n.)

1520s, "process of becoming, or state of being, a son," from French filiation, from Medieval Latin filiationem (nominative filiatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of filiare "to have a child," from Latin filius/filia "son/daughter" (see filial). As "relationship of a son or daughter to a parent" (correlative of paternity) from 1794.

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Parvati 

Hindu divinity, from Sanskrit, literally "(daughter) of the mountain," from parvata "mountain."

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