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dative (adj., n.)

mid-15c., in grammar, the case of nouns, pronouns, and adjectives denoting an indirect object of the action of the verb, from Latin dativus "pertaining to giving," from datus "given" (from PIE root *do- "to give"); in grammatical use from Greek dotikē (ptōsis) "dative (case)," from dotikos "of giving nature," from dotos "given" (from the same PIE root as the Latin word).

The notion is of the case that belongs to giving or commanding. Typically the case of the indirect object, but sometimes also denoting "motion toward." In old Germanic languages, the "fourth case," catch-all for Indo-European dative, ablative, locative, and other cases. In law, "that may be disposed of at pleasure," from 1530s.

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*do- 

*dō-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to give."

It forms all or part of: add; anecdote; antidote; betray; condone; dacha; dado; data; date (n.1) "time;" dative; deodand; die (n.); donation; donative; donor; Dorian; Dorothy; dose; dowager; dower; dowry; edition; endow; Eudora; fedora; Isidore; mandate; Pandora; pardon; perdition; Polydorus; render; rent (n.1) "payment for use of property;" sacerdotal; samizdat; surrender; Theodore; Theodosia; tradition; traitor; treason; vend.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit dadati "gives," danam "offering, present;" Old Persian dadatuv "let him give;" Greek didomi, didonai, "to give, offer," dōron "gift;" Latin dare "to give, grant, offer," donum "gift;" Armenian tam "to give;" Old Church Slavonic dati "give," dani "tribute;" Lithuanian duoti "to give," duonis "gift;" Old Irish dan "gift, endowment, talent," Welsh dawn "gift."

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himself (pron.)
Old English him selfum, from dative/accusative personal pronoun him + self, here used as an inflected adjective.
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him (pron.)
Old English him, originally dative masculine and neuter of he, from Proto-Germanic *hi- (see he). Beginning 10c. it replaced hine as masculine accusative, a process completed by 15c. The dative roots of the -m ending are retained in German (ihm) and Dutch (hem). Hine persists, barely, as the southern England dialectal 'un, 'n for "him."
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nobis 

"with us, for our part," Latin dative of nos "we" (from PIE *nos; see us).

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abed (adv.)

"in bed," c. 1200, contraction of Old English on bedde "in bed," from a- (1) + dative of bed (n.).

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meseems (v.)

"it seems to me," late 14c., me semeth, from me (pron.), dative of I,  + seem (v.). Archaic. Compare methinks.

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heretofore (adv.)
c. 1200, from here + obsolete Old English toforan "formerly, before now," from to (prep.) + foran (adv.) "in front," dative of for. Also in Middle English heretoforn.
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hisself (pron.)
c. 1400; a shift in felt meaning of the first element of himself (q.v.) from dative to genitive created this new word, but the same process did not change herself.
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them (pron.)
third person plural pronoun, c. 1200, from Old Norse þeim, dative of plural personal and demonstrative pronoun þeir (see they). Replaced Old English cognate him, heom.
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