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71 entries found.
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vae victis 
Latin, literally "woe to the vanquished," from Livy, "History" V.xlviii.9.
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Mothers' Day 
the spelling used in the U.S. congressional resolution first recognizing it, May 9, 1908.
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bloodthirsty (adj.)
also blood-thirsty, "eager to shed blood," 1530s (Coverdale, Psalms xxv.9), from blood (n.) + thirsty (adj.). Ancient Greek had a similar image in haimodipsos. Related: Bloodthirstiness.
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Kristallnacht (n.)
in reference to the pogrom of Nov. 9-10, 1938, in Germany and Austria; from German, literally "crystal night;" often translated as "Night of Broken Glass." See crystal (n.) + night (n.).
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anker (n.)
also anchor, liquid measure in North Sea and Baltic trade (equivalent to from 9 to a little more than 10 gallons), early 14c., from Dutch, related to German Anker, Swedish ankare, Medieval Latin anceria "keg, vat," which is of unknown origin.
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reem (n.)

1719, Hebrew name of an animal in the Old Testament (Job xxxix.9, etc.), now identified with the wild ox, but formerly translated in Latin as rhinoceros and in English as unicorn.

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undern (n.)
an obsolete Old English and Middle English word for "morning;" in Old English originally "third hour of the day; 9 a.m." (corresponding to tierce). Hence underngeweorc, undernmete "breakfast." Common Germanic: Old Frisian unden, Old Saxon undorn, Middle Dutch onderen, Old High German untarn, Old Norse undorn; of uncertain origin. By extension, "period from 9 a.m. to noon;" but from 13c. shifting to "midday, noon" (as in undern-mete "lunch," 14c.); and by late 15c. to "late afternoon or early evening."
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bench-warmer (n.)

1892, baseball slang; see bench.

The days for "bench-warmers" with salaries are also past. [New York Sporting News, Jan. 9, 1892]

Old English had bencsittend "one who sits on a bench."

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seer (n.)
late 14c., "one to whom divine revelations are made," agent noun from see (v.). Originally rendering Latin videns, Greek bleptor (from Hebrew roeh) in Bible translations (such as I Kings ix.9). Literal sense of "one who sees" is attested from early 15c.
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ninepins (n.)

"the game of bowls, played in an alley," 1570s, from nine + plural of pin (n.). From the number of pins to be knocked down. The game also was known as nine-pegs (1670s). Nine-holes(1570s) was a once-popular game in which players roll small balls at 9 holes made in a board or on the ground.

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