Etymology
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dalek (n.)

robot in the "Dr. Who" television program on BBC, 1963, an invented word of no etymology.

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Dallas 

city in Texas, U.S., settled 1841, named 1846 for George M. Dallas (1792-1864), U.S. vice president under Polk (1845-49). The family name (13c.) is from the barony of Dallas (Moray) or means "dweller at the house in the dale."

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dalle (n.)

the source of The Dalles, city name in Oregon, U.S., from dalle, the name given by French employees of the Hudson's Bay Company and its successors to certain situations of rivers, the best-known being the one on the Columbia River that gives the city its name. The French word might be a reference to trough-like channels, from Low German or Dutch daal "outlet, drain," or it might be from a different but identical word meaning "slab or large tile of stone."

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dalliance (n.)

also daliance, mid-14c., daliaunce "edifying or spiritual conversation," from dally + -ance. Probably formed in Anglo-French but not attested there. From late 14c. as "polite conversation, chat, small talk; amorous talk, flirtation, coquetry;" meaning "idle or frivolous activity" is from 1540s.

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dally (v.)

c. 1300, dalien, "to speak seriously, commune;" late 14c., "to talk intimately, converse politely," possibly from Anglo-French dalier "to amuse oneself," Old French dalier, dailer, which is of uncertain origin. Sense of "waste time" in any manner emerged by late 14c.; that of "to play, sport, frolic; flirt, engage in amorous exchanges" is from mid-15c. Meaning "to linger, loiter, delay (intransitive)" is from 1530s. Related: Dallied; dallying.

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Dalmatia 
region along the eastern Adriatic coast in what is now Croatia, of uncertain origin. Perhaps from a derivative of PIE *dhal- "to bloom," in a sense of "young animal," in reference to the mountain pastures.
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Dalmatian 

1670s, "of or pertaining to Dalmatia" (q.v.); as a noun, 1580s, "inhabitant of Dalmatia."

The breed of spotted dogs so called from 1893, short for Dalmatian dog (1810), presumably named for Dalmatia, but dog breeders argue over whether there is a Croatian ancestry for the breed, which seems to be represented in Egyptian bas-reliefs and Hellenic friezes. They were popular in early 1800s as carriage dogs, trotting alongside carriages and guarding the vehicles in owner's absence (the alternative name coach-dog is attested from 1792). Even fire departments nowadays tend to spell it *Dalmation.

THE use to which this beautiful and shewy breed is applied, being so universally known both in Town and Country, needs a bare mention: how long it has been the fashion to keep these dogs, as attendants of the Coach Horse Stable, and as precursors to the Carriage, as if to clear the way and announce its approach, does not appear in our common books of reference on the subject; but the practice may probably be a century or two old, and was doubtless derived from Continental usage. ["The Sportsman's Repository," London, 1831]
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Dalmatic (adj.)

"of or pertaining to Dalmatia," c. 1600; see Dalmatia. As a noun from early 15c. in reference to a kind of robe or vestment. Related: Dalmatical (1590s).

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Dalton 

1920 in reference to a plan or system of school education designed by Helen Parkhurst, from Dalton, Massachusetts, U.S., where it was first adopted. For Daltonism (a reference to English chemist John Dalton), see color-blindness. Daltonian, in reference to Dalton's work, is attested by 1813.

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dam (v.)

"obstruct or restrain a flow by means of a dam," c. 1400, from dam (n.1). Related: Dammed; damming.

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