Etymology
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decree (n.)

"special ordinance or regulation promulgated by authority," early 14c., originally ecclesiastical, secular use is by late 14c., from Old French decre, variant of decret (12c., Modern French décret), from Latin decretum, neuter of decretus, past participle of decernere "to decree, decide, pronounce a decision," from de (see de-) + cernere "to separate" (from PIE root *krei- "to sieve," thus "discriminate, distinguish").

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decree (v.)

"to order or promulgate with authority," late 14c., decreen, from decree (n.). Related: Decreed; decreeing.

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decrement (n.)

1620s, "act or state of decreasing;" 1660s, "quantity lost by gradual waste," from Latin decrementum "diminution," from stem of decrescere "to grow less, diminish," from de "away from" (see de-) + crescere "to grow" (from PIE root *ker- (2) "to grow").

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decrepit (adj.)

"broken down in health, weakened, especially by age," mid-15c., from Old French decrepit (15c., Modern French décrépit), from Latin decrepitus "very old, infirm" (of old men and old animals), from de "down" (see de-) + *crepitus, past participle of crepare "to crack, break" (see raven). The literal sense of the Latin word is uncertain. Related: Decrepitly.

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decrepitation (n.)

"act of snapping or bursting with a crackling noise when heated," 1660s, from Latin decrepitationem (nominative decrepitatio), from de- + crepitatus, past participle of crepitare "to crack, break" (see raven).

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decrepitude (n.)

"state of being broken down by infirmities," c. 1600, from French décrépitude (14c.), from Latin decrepitus "very old, infirm," from de "down" (see de-) + *crepitus, past participle of crepare "to crack, break" (see raven).

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decrescendo (n.)

in music, "a gradual diminution in force, a passing from loud to soft," 1806, from Italian decrescendo, present participle of decrescere, from Latin decrescere "to grow less, diminish," from de "away from" (see de-) + crescere "to grow" (from PIE root *ker- (2) "to grow"). Also as an adjective and adverb.

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decretory (adj.)

"pertaining to or following a decree," 1630s, from Latin decretorius, from decretum (see decree (n.)). Related: Decretorial (1580s).

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decriminalization (n.)

1945; see de- + criminal (adj.) + -ization. Especially in reference to narcotics since c. 1968.

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decriminalize (v.)
1963, "to reform a criminal," back-formation from decriminalization. Meaning "to make legal something that formerly had been illegal" was in use by 1970 (there are isolated instances back to 1867). Related: Decriminalized; decriminalizing.
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