Etymology
Advertisement
deck (v.2)

"to knock down," by 1955, probably from deck (n.) on the notion of laying someone out on a ship's deck. Compare floor (v.) "to knock down." Related: Decked; decking.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
decker (adj.)

in combinations, "having a (specified) number of decks," originally of vessels, 1795, from deck (n.). Later of stacked sandwiches.

Related entries & more 
deck-hand (n.)

"person regularly employed as a laborer on the deck of a vessel," 1839, American English, from deck (n.) in the nautical sense + hand (n.) "manual worker."

Related entries & more 
deckle (n.)

1810, in paper-making, "rectangular frame on which the pulp is placed," from German deckel "lid, little cover," diminutive of decke "cover," from Old High German decchen "to cover," from Proto-Germanic *thakjan, from PIE root *(s)teg- "to cover." Meaning "rough or raw edge of paper" is by 1858.

Related entries & more 
declaim (v.)
Origin and meaning of declaim

late 14c., "practice oratory, make a formal speech or oration," from Old French declamer (Modern French déclamer) and directly from Latin declamare "to practice public speaking, to bluster," from de-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see de-) + clamare "to cry, shout" (from PIE root *kele- (2) "to shout").

At first in English spelled declame, but altered under influence of claim. From 1570s as "speak or write as an exercise in elocution;" from 1795 as "speak aloud passionately in an appeal to the emotions of the audience." Related: Declaimed; declaiming.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
declamation (n.)

late 14c., declamacioun, "composition written to be declaimed," from Latin declamationem (nominative declamatio) "exercise in oratorical delivery; declamation;" in a bad sense, "loud, eager talking," noun of action from past-participle stem of declamare "to practice public speaking, to bluster," from de-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see de-) + clamare "to cry, shout" (from PIE root *kele- (2) "to shout"). Meaning "a public harangue or speech" is from 1520s; sense of "act of making rhetorical harangues in public" is from 1550s.

Related entries & more 
declamatory (adj.)

"of or characteristic of a declamation," 1580s, from Latin declamatorius "pertaining to the practice of speaking," from declamatus, past participle of declamare "to practice public speaking, to bluster," from de-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see de-) + clamare "to cry, shout" (from PIE root *kele- (2) "to shout").

Related entries & more 
declarant (n.)

"one who makes a declaration," 1680s, from French déclarant, from Latin declarantem (nominative declarans), present participle of declarare  "make clear, reveal, disclose, announce," from de-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see de-) + clarare "clarify," from clarus "clear" (see clear (adj.)). Especially in law, "one whose admission or statement is sought as evidence."

Related entries & more 
declaration (n.)
Origin and meaning of declaration

late 14c., declaracioun, "an explanation, a statement, action of stating clearly," from Old French declaration and directly from Latin declarationem (nominative declaratio) "a making clear or evident, a disclosure, exposition," noun of action from past-participle stem of declarare "make clear, reveal, disclose, announce," from de-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see de-) + clarare "clarify," from clarus "clear" (see clear (adj.)).

The meaning "proclamation, formal public statement" is from c. 1400; that of "document by which an announcement or assertion is formally made" is from 1650s, as in declaration of independence, which is is recorded from 1776 (the one issued in that year by the British American colonies seems to be the first so called; though the phrase is not in the document itself, it was titled that from the first in the press). Declaration of war is by 1762.

Related entries & more 
declarative (adj.)

1530s, "making clear or manifest, explanatory," from French déclaratif and directly from Late Latin declarativus, from past-participle stem of Latin declarare "make clear, reveal, disclose, announce," from de-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see de-) + clarare "clarify," from clarus "clear" (see clear (adj.)).

Meaning "making declaration, exhibiting" is from 1620s. The word was used in mid-15c. as a noun meaning "an explanation." Related: Declaratively.

Related entries & more 

Page 37