Etymology
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cytology (n.)

"the study of the cells of organisms," 1857, from cyto- "cell" + -logy. Related: Cytologist (1884); cytological.

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non-disjunction (n.)

also nondisjunction, 1913, in cytology, from non- + disjunction. Related: Non-disjunctional.

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interphase (n.)

in cytology, 1913, from German interphase (1912); see inter- "between" + phase (n.).

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telophase (n.)

1895 in cytology, from Greek telo-, combining form of telos "the end, fulfillment, completion" (see telos) + phase (n.).

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centriole (n.)

in cytology, a minute body within a centrosome, 1896, from German centriol (1895), from Modern Latin centriolum, diminutive of Latin centrum (see center (n.), and compare centrosome).

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chiasma (n.)

1832, in anatomy, "a crossing, an intersection," medical Latin, from Latinized form of Greek khiasma "two things placed crosswise," which is related to khiasmos (see chi, and compare chiasmus). In cytology from 1911. Related: Chiasmal.

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reticulum (n.)

1650s, "second stomach of a ruminant" (so called from the folds of the membrane), from Latin reticulum "a little net" (see rete). The word was later given various uses in biology, cytology, histology, etc., and made a southern constellation by La Caille (1763).

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