Etymology
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curve (n.)

1690s, "curved line, a continuous bending without angles," from curve (v.). With reference to the female figure (usually plural, curves), from 1862; in reference to statistical graphs, by 1854; as a type of baseball pitch that does not move in a straight line, from 1879. An old name for it was slow. "Slows are balls simply tossed to the bat with a line of delivery so curved as to make them almost drop on the home base." [Chadwick's Base Ball Manual, 1874]

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curve (v.)

early 15c. (implied in curved), intransitive, "have or assume a curved form," from Latin curvus "crooked, curved, bent," and curvare "to bend," both from PIE root *sker- (2) "to turn, bend." Transitive sense of  "cause to take the shape of a curve, bend" is from 1660s.

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curvy (adj.)

"full of or characterized by curves," 1845, from curve (n.) + -y (2). Related: Curviness.

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curvity (n.)

"state of being curved," 1540s, from Late Latin curvitatem (nominative curvitas), noun of state from past-participle stem of curvare "to bend, curve" (see curve (v.)).

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curvaceous (adj.)

1936, U.S. colloquial, from curve (n.) + facetious use of -aceous, the Modern Latin botanical suffix meaning "of a certain kind." First recorded reference is in "Screen Book" magazine, writing of Mae West.

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recurve (v.)

also re-curve, "curve back, turn backward," 1620s, from re- "back" + curve (v.), or else from Latin recurvare. Related: Recurved; recurving; recurvation (1590s); recurvant; recurvature. The earlier verb was now-obsolete recurvate (1590s).

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curvilinear (adj.)

"having or consisting of curved lines," 1710, from curvi-, combining form of Latin curvus "curved, crooked, bent" (see curve (v.)) + linearis, from linea "line" (see line (n.)). Earlier was curvilineal (1650s).

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cavort (v.)

1793, cauvaut, "to prance, bustle nimbly or eagerly," American English, of uncertain origin, sometimes said to be an alteration of curvet "a leap by a horse," a word from French that is related to curve (v.). Or perhaps from ca-, ka-, colloquial intensive prefix + vault (v.) "to jump, leap." Modern form attested by 1829. Related: Cavorted; cavorting.

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*sker- (2)

also *ker-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to turn, bend."

It forms all or part of: arrange; circa; circadian; circle; circuit; circum-; circumcision; circumflex; circumnavigate; circumscribe; circumspect; circumstance; circus; cirque; corona; crepe; crest; crinoline; crisp; crown;  curb; curvature; curve; derange;  flounce (n.) "deep ruffle on the skirt of a dress;" krone; ring (n.1) "circular band;" ranch; range; ranger; rank (n.) "row, line series;" research; recherche; ridge; rink; rucksack; search; shrink.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Latin curvus "bent, curved," crispus "curly;" Old Church Slavonic kragu "circle;" perhaps Greek kirkos "ring," koronos "curved;" Old English hring "ring, small circlet."

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sinus (n.)
"hollow curve or cavity in the body," early 15c., from Medieval Latin sinus, from Latin sinus "bend, fold, curve, a bent surface; a bay, bight, gulf; a fold in land;" also "fold of the toga about the breast," hence "bosom," and figuratively "love, affection, intimacy; interior, inmost part;" of unknown origin.
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