Etymology
Advertisement
curl (v.)

late 14c. (implied in curled), "turn, bend, form in ringlets" (transitive), a metathesized formation corresponding to the Middle English adjective crull, crulle (c. 1300), which is probably from an unrecorded Old English word or from Middle Dutch krul "curly," from Proto-Germanic *krusl- (source also of East Frisian krull "lock of hair," Middle High German krol, Norwegian krull, Danish krølle "curl").

Intransitive sense of "take the form of a curl, assume a spiral shape" is from 1520s (originally of hair). Meaning "to play at curling" is from 1715.  Related: Curled; curling.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
curl (n.)

c. 1600, "a ringlet of hair;" by 1610s in reference to anything of similar spiral or undulating form; from curl (v.). Surfer slang for "curved top of a breaking wave" is by 1962.

Related entries & more 
curly (adj.)

"having curls, tending to curl," 1770s, from curl (n.) + -y (2); earliest use is of hair. Related: Curliness.

Related entries & more 
uncurl (v.)
1580s, intransitive; 1590s, transitive," from un- (2) "reverse, opposite of" + curl (v.).
Related entries & more 
curler (n.)

1748, "one who or that which curls," agent noun from curl (v.). As "a cylinder for curling the hair," 1887. As "one who plays at curling," 1630s. Related: Curlers.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
cruller (n.)

kind of doughnut fried crisp in boiling lard, 1805, American English, apparently from Dutch kruller, from krullen "to curl," from Middle Dutch crullen, which is cognate with curl (v.). Compare Frisian krillen, Swedish krulla; also Middle English crullen "to curl (the hair)."

Related entries & more 
curling (n.)

"action of turning, bending, or forming into ringlets," mid-15c., verbal noun from curl (v.). Curling-iron "rod of iron to be used hot for curling the hair" is from 1630s.

The game played with stones on ice, originally Scottish, is so-called by 1610s, but the sense connection is obscure. "The name appears to describe the motion given to the stone" [OED]. Evidence of the sport dates to the early 16c. in Scotland; written accounts of the game date to the 1540s. A similar game is described from c. 1600 in Flanders.

Related entries & more 
cirrus (n.)

1708, "curl-like fringe or tuft," from Latin cirrus "a lock of hair, tendril, curl, ringlet of hair; the fringe of a garment." In meteorology, in reference to light, fleecy clouds, attested from 1803; so called from fancied resemblance of shape.

Related entries & more 
frizzle (v.)

"curl hair," 1560s, of obscure origin. There are words of similar sound and sense in Old English (fris "curly"), Old Frisian (frisle), French (friser "to curl") but their history is tangled; probably connected somehow to frizz (v.). Related: Frizzled; frizzling. As a noun from 1610s, "a short curl," from the verb. Frizzling iron was a 17c. term for "curling iron."

Related entries & more 
friseur (n.)
"hairdresser," mid-18c, from French friseur, from friser "to curl, frizz" (see frizz (v.)). Archaic from mid-19c.
Related entries & more