Etymology
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curious (adj.)

mid-14c., "subtle, sophisticated;" late 14c., "eager to know, inquisitive, desirous of seeing" (often in a bad sense), also "wrought with or requiring care and art;" from Old French curios "solicitous, anxious, inquisitive; odd, strange" (Modern French curieux) and directly from Latin curiosus "careful, diligent; inquiring eagerly, meddlesome," akin to cura "care" (see cure (n.)).

The objective sense of "exciting curiosity" is by 1715 in English. In booksellers' catalogues, the word was a euphemism for "erotic, pornographic" (1877); such material was called curiosa (1883), the Latin neuter plural of curiosus. Related: Curiously; curiousness. Curiouser and curiouser is from "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" (1865).

Curious and inquisitive may be used in a good or a bad sense, but inquisitive is more often, and prying is only, found in the latter. Curious expresses only the desire to know; inquisitive, the effort to find out by inquiry; prying, the effort to find out secrets by looking and working in improper ways. [Century Dictionary]
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uncurious (adj.)

1560s, "not inquisitive," from un- (1) "not" + curious (adj.). From 1680s as "not odd or strange."

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incurious (adj.)

1560s, "negligent, heedless," from Latin incuriosus "careless, negligent, unconcerned," from in- "not, opposite of, without" (see in- (1)) + curiosus (see curious). Meaning "uninquisitive" is from 1610s. Objective sense of "unworthy of attention" is from 1747. Related: Incuriously. Incuriosity is attested from c. 1600.

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curio (n.)

1851, "piece of bric-a-brac from the Far East," a shortening of curiosity (n.) in the "object of interest" sense (1640s). Extended by 1890s to rare or interesting bric-a-brac from anywhere.

Curioso (1650s) was a 17c.-18c. word for "one who is curious" (about science, art, etc.) also "one who admires or collects curiosities," from Italian curioso "curious person."

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inclement (adj.)

1660s, from French inclément (16c.) and directly from Latin inclementem (nominative inclemens) "harsh, unmerciful," from in- "not, opposite of, without" (see in- (1)) + clementem "mild, placid." "Limitation to weather is curious" [Weekley].

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investigative (adj.)

"of or pertaining to investigation, curious and deliberative in research," 1803, from Latin investigat-, past-participle stem of investigare (see investigation) + -ive. Journalism sense is from 1951.

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fairly (adv.)

c. 1400, "handsomely," from fair (adj.) + -ly (2). Meaning "impartially, justly" is from 1670s. Sense of "somewhat" is from 1805, a curious contrast to the earlier, but still active, sense of "totally" (1590s). Old English had fægerlice "splendidly."

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bric-a-brac (n.)

deprecative term for objects having a certain interest from being old, pretty, or curious, but no claim to art, 1840, from obsolete French à bric et à brac (16c.) "at random, any old way," a nonsense phrase.

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bibliopole (n.)

"bookseller," 1775, from Latin bibliopola, from Greek bibliopōlēs "bookseller," from biblion "book" (see biblio-) + pōlēs "merchant, seller," from pōlein "to sell" (from PIE root *pel- (4) "to sell"). Especially a dealer in rare or curious books. French has bouquinist "a dealer in second-hand books of little value."

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handkerchief (n.)

1520s, from hand + kerchief, originally "cloth for covering the head," but since Middle English used generally as "piece of cloth used about the person." A curious confluence of words for "hand" and "head." By-form handkercher was in use 16c.-19c. A dropped handkerchief as a token of flirtation or courtship is attested by mid-18c.

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