Etymology
Advertisement
orthopedist (n.)

"one skilled in curing natural deformities in the human body," 1853, from orthopedy (1840), from French orthopédie (18c.); see orthopedic + -ist.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
therapy (n.)
1846, "medical treatment of disease," from Modern Latin therapia, from Greek therapeia "curing, healing, service done to the sick; a waiting on, service," from therapeuein "to cure, treat medically," literally "attend, do service, take care of" (see therapeutic).
Related entries & more 
orthopedics (n.)

"act of curing or remedying deformities in the bodies of children or in persons generally," 1853, from orthopedic. Also see -ics. The form orthopaedy is attested from 1840, from French.

Related entries & more 
curation (n.)

late 14c., curacioun, "curing of disease, restoration to health," from Old French curacion "treatment of illness," from Latin curationem (nominative curatio), "a taking care, attention, management," especially "medical attention," noun of action from past-participle stem of curare "to cure" (see cure (v.)). From 1769 as "management, guardianship."

Related entries & more 
remedial (adj.)

1650s, "curing, relieving, affording a remedy," from Late Latin remedialis "healing, curing," from Latin remedium "a cure, remedy, medicine, antidote, that which restores health," from re-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (or perhaps literally, "again;" see re-), + mederi "to heal" (from PIE root *med- "take appropriate measures").

Educational sense of "concerned with improving skills of students not as proficient as their peers or as required" is by 1879. In reference to physical exercise or training to overcome muscular or postural deficiencies, by 1925. Related: Remedially.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
chiropractic 

in reference to the curing of diseases by manipulation of the spine or other bodily structures, coined in American English, 1898 (adj.); 1899 (n.), from chiro- "hand" + praktikos "practical" (see practical), the whole of it loosely meant as "done by hand."

Related entries & more 
alyssum (n.)
type of European flowering plant, 1550s, from Latin alysson, from Greek alysson, which is perhaps the neuter of adjective alyssos "curing madness," from a- "not, without" (see a- (3)) + lyssa "madness, martial rage, fury," an abstract word probably literally "wolf-ness" and related to lykos "wolf" (see wolf (n.)); but some see a connection with "light" words, in reference to the glittering eyes of the mad.
Related entries & more 
curative (adj.)

early 15c., "pertaining to curing; having the power to heal," from Old French curatif (15c.) "curative, healing" and directly from Latin curat-, past-participle stem of curare "to cure" (see cure (v.)). As a noun, "something that has power to heal, a remedy," by 1857.

Related entries & more 
therapeutic (adj.)
pertaining to the healing of disease, 1640s, from Modern Latin therapeuticus "curing, healing," from Greek therapeutikos, from therapeutein "to cure, treat medically," primarily "do service, take care of, provide for," of unknown origin, related to therapon "attendant." Therapeutic was used from 1540s as a noun meaning "the branch of medicine concerned with treatment of disease." Related: Therapeutical (c. 1600).
Related entries & more 
psychotherapy (n.)

"art of curing mental diseases," 1892, from psycho- + therapy, on model of French psychothérapie (1889). In early use also of treatment of diseases by "psychic" methods (mainly hypnotism). Psychotherapeia was used in medical writing in 1853 as "remedial influence of the mind." Related: Psychotherapeutic (1890, in reference to hypnotic treatment); psychotherapeutics (1872).

Related entries & more