Etymology
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cure (n.2)

"parish priest in France or a French country," from French curé (13c.), from Medieval Latin curatus "one responsible for the care (of souls)," from Latin curatus, past participle of curare "to take care of" (see cure (v.) ). Also compare curate (n.).

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cure (v.)

late 14c., "to restore to health or a sound state," from Old French curer and directly from Latin curare "take care of," hence, in medical language, "treat medically, cure" (see cure (n.1)). In reference to fish, pork, etc., "prepare for preservation by drying, salting, etc.," attested by 1743. Related: Cured; curing.

Most words for "cure, heal" in European languages originally applied to the person being treated but now can be used with reference to the disease. Relatively few show an ancient connection to words for "physician;" typically they are connected instead to words for "make whole" or "tend to" or even "conjurer." French guérir (with Italian guarir, Old Spanish guarir) is from a Germanic verb stem also found in in Gothic warjan, Old English wearian "ward off, prevent, defend" (see warrant (n.)).

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cure (n.1)

c. 1300, "care, heed," from Latin cura "care, concern, trouble," with many figurative extensions over time such as "study; administration; office of a parish priest; a mistress," and also "means of healing, successful remedial treatment of a disease" (late 14c.), from Old Latin coira-, a noun of unknown origin. Meaning "medical care" is late 14c.

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cure-all (n.)

1835, "panacea, remedy for all kinds of diseases," from cure (v.) + all. As a name of various plants, it is attested from 1793. Compare heal-all, panacea.

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rest-cure (n.)

"treatment of nervous exhaustion by prolonged complete rest, isolation in bed, etc.," 1877, from rest (n.1) "repose" + cure (n.1) "means of healing."

To [Dr. S. Weir Mitchel] also belongs the honor of having devised the method known as the "rest cure," which has proven so beneficial in a class of cases constituting an "opprobrium medicorum." He defines this class to be "chiefly women—nervous women, who as a rule are thin and lack blood"—treated in turn for gastric, spinal or uterine troubles, but who remained at the end, as at the beginning, invalids, unable to attend to the duties of life, and sources of discomfort to themselves and anxiety to others. [Chicago Medical Gazette, Jan. 20, 1880]
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curette (n.)

small surgical instrument for smoothing or scraping away, 1753, from French curette "a scoop, scraper" (15c.), from curer "to clear, cleanse" (from Latin curare; see cure (v.)) + -ette (see -ette).

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curable (adj.)

"capable of being healed or cured," late 14c., a native formation from cure (v.) + -able, or else from Old French curable (13c.) and directly from Late Latin curabilis, from Latin curare. Related: Curably; curability; curableness.

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curative (adj.)

early 15c., "pertaining to curing; having the power to heal," from Old French curatif (15c.) "curative, healing" and directly from Latin curat-, past-participle stem of curare "to cure" (see cure (v.)). As a noun, "something that has power to heal, a remedy," by 1857.

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sinecure (n.)
1660s, "church benefice with an emolument but without parish duties," from Medieval Latin beneficium sine cura "benefice without care" (of souls), from Latin sine "without" (see sans) + cura, ablative singular of cura "care" (see cure (n.1)).
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manicure (n.)

1873, "one who professionally treats hands and fingernails," from French manicure, literally "the care of the hands and fingernails," from Latin manus "hand" (from PIE root *man- (2) "hand") + cura "care" (see cure (n.1)). Meaning "treatment and care of the hands and fingernails" is attested by 1887.

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