Etymology
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curb (v.)

1520s, of horses, "to lead to a curb," from curb (n.). Figurative sense of "bend to one's will, hold in check" is from 1580s. Related: Curbed; curbing.

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curb (n.)

late 15c., "strap passing under the jaw of a horse" (attached to the bit of the bridle and used to restrain the animal), from Old French courbe "curb on a horse" (12c.), from Latin curvus, from curvare "to bend," from PIE root *sker- (2) "to turn, bend." The same word was used late 14c. in the sense of "a hump," and in Anglo-Latin as "curved or arched piece of timber" (late 13c.).

Meaning "enclosed framework" is from 1510s, probably originally with a notion of "curved;" extended to margins of garden beds by 1731; to "margin of joined, upright stones between a sidewalk and road" by 1791 (sometimes in this sense spelled kerb). Figurative sense of "a check, a restraint, that which holds back" is from 1610s.

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curbstone (n.)

also curb-stone, "stone placed against earthwork, etc., to keep it from spreading, one of the stones set together at the outer edge of a street or sidewalk," by 1775, from curb (n.) + stone (n.).

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uncurbed (adj.)
1590s, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of curb (v.).
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kerb (n.)
1660s, a spelling variant of curb (n.); in early use also kirb. It is the preferred British English spelling in certain specialized senses, especially "edging of stone on a pavement" (1805). Related: Kerbing; kerbstone.
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*sker- (2)

also *ker-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to turn, bend."

It forms all or part of: arrange; circa; circadian; circle; circuit; circum-; circumcision; circumflex; circumnavigate; circumscribe; circumspect; circumstance; circus; cirque; corona; crepe; crest; crinoline; crisp; crown;  curb; curvature; curve; derange;  flounce (n.) "deep ruffle on the skirt of a dress;" krone; ring (n.1) "circular band;" ranch; range; ranger; rank (n.) "row, line series;" research; recherche; ridge; rink; rucksack; search; shrink.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Latin curvus "bent, curved," crispus "curly;" Old Church Slavonic kragu "circle;" perhaps Greek kirkos "ring," koronos "curved;" Old English hring "ring, small circlet."

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grommet (n.)
also gromet, grummet, 1620s, "ring or wreath of rope," from obsolete French gromette "curb of a bridle" (Modern French gourmette), from gourmer "to curb," of uncertain origin. Extended sense of "metal eyelet" first recorded 1769.
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frenum (n.)
1741, from Latin frenum "a bridle, curb, bit," which is of unknown origin.
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restrain (v.)

mid-14c., restreinen, "to stop, prevent, curb" (a vice, purpose, appetite, desire), from stem of Old French restraindre, restreindre "to press, push together; curb, bridle; bandage" (12c.), from Latin restringere "draw back tightly, tie back; confine, check" (see restriction).

From late 14c. as "keep (someone or something) from a course of action," hence "keep in check or under control, deprive (someone) of liberty by restraint" (1520s). Related: Restrained; restraining; restrainer; restrainable.

That which we restrain we keep within limits; that which we restrict we keep within certain definite limits; that which we repress we try to put out of existence. [Century Dictionary, 1902]
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hackamore (n.)
halter chiefly used for breaking horses, 1850, American English, of uncertain origin. OED and Klein suggests a corruption of Spanish jaquima (earlier xaquima) "halter, headstall of a horse," which Klein suggests is from Arabic shakimah "bit of a bridle, curb, restraint."
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