Etymology
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curare (n.)

formerly also curari, curara, resinous plant substance used by South American natives for poisoning their arrows, later used medicinally as a muscle relaxant, 1777, from Portuguese or Spanish curare, a corruption of the name in the Carib language of the Macusi Indians of Guyana, wurali or wurari, which had a sort of click sound at the beginning, and is said to mean "he to whom it comes falls" (when introduced into the blood the effect is almost instantly fatal).

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curative (adj.)

early 15c., "pertaining to curing; having the power to heal," from Old French curatif (15c.) "curative, healing" and directly from Latin curat-, past-participle stem of curare "to cure" (see cure (v.)). As a noun, "something that has power to heal, a remedy," by 1857.

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curette (n.)

small surgical instrument for smoothing or scraping away, 1753, from French curette "a scoop, scraper" (15c.), from curer "to clear, cleanse" (from Latin curare; see cure (v.)) + -ette (see -ette).

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curable (adj.)

"capable of being healed or cured," late 14c., a native formation from cure (v.) + -able, or else from Old French curable (13c.) and directly from Late Latin curabilis, from Latin curare. Related: Curably; curability; curableness.

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cure (n.2)

"parish priest in France or a French country," from French curé (13c.), from Medieval Latin curatus "one responsible for the care (of souls)," from Latin curatus, past participle of curare "to take care of" (see cure (v.) ). Also compare curate (n.).

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curator (n.)

"a guardian; one who has care or superintendence of something," late 14c., curatour "a parish priest," from Latin curator "overseer, manager, guardian," agent noun from curatus, past participle of curare (see cure (v.)). From early 15c. in reference to those put in charge of minors, lunatics, etc.; meaning "officer in charge of a museum, library, etc." is from 1660s. Related: Curatorship.

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curation (n.)

late 14c., curacioun, "curing of disease, restoration to health," from Old French curacion "treatment of illness," from Latin curationem (nominative curatio), "a taking care, attention, management," especially "medical attention," noun of action from past-participle stem of curare "to cure" (see cure (v.)). From 1769 as "management, guardianship."

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pedicure (n.)

1839, "one whose business is surgical care of feet" (removal of corns, bunions, etc.), from French pédicure, from Latin pes (genitive pedis) "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot") + curare "to care for," from cura "care" (see cure (n.1.)). In reference to the treatment itself, attested from 1890; specifically as a beauty treatment, by 1900.

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accurate (adj.)
1610s, "done with care," from Latin accuratus "prepared with care, exact, elaborate," past participle of accurare "take care of," from ad "to" (see ad-) + curare "take care of" (see cure (n.1)). The notion of doing something carefully led to that of being precise (1650s). A stronger word than correct (adj.), weaker than exact (adj.). Related: Accurately; accurateness.
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curate (n.)

late 14c., "spiritual guide, ecclesiastic responsible for the spiritual welfare of those in his charge; parish priest," from Medieval Latin curatus "one responsible for the care (of souls)," from Latin curatus, past participle of curare "to take care of" (see cure (v.)). Church of England sense of "paid deputy priest of a parish" first recorded 1550s.

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