Etymology
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cultural (adj.)

1813, "of or pertaining to the raising of plants or animals," from Latin cultura "tillage, a cultivating, agriculture," figuratively "care, culture, an honoring," from past participle stem of colere "to tend, guard; to till, cultivate" (see colony). With -al (1). Figurative senses of "relating to civilizations," also "the cultivation of the mind," are attested by 1875; hence, "relating to the culture of a particular place at a particular time" (by 1909).

Cultural anthropology is attested by 1910, and cultural has been a fertile starter-word among anthropologists and sociologists, for example cultural diffusion, in use by 1912; cultural diversity, by 1935; cultural imperialism, by 1937; cultural pluralism, by 1932; cultural relativism, by 1948. China's Cultural Revolution (1966) began in 1965; the name is a shortened translation of Chinese Wuchan Jieji Wenhua Da Geming "Proletarian Cultural Great Revolution." 

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ecology (n.)
Origin and meaning of ecology

1873, oecology, "branch of science dealing with the relationship of living things to their environments," coined in German by German zoologist Ernst Haeckel as Ökologie, from Greek oikos "house, dwelling place, habitation" (from PIE root *weik- (1) "clan") + -logia "study of" (see -logy). In use with reference to anti-pollution activities from 1960s.

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culturally (adv.)

1889, "in a cultural manner," from cultural + -ly (2).

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ecological (adj.)

1899, see ecology + -ical. Related: Ecologically.

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hydric (adj.)

1796 as a term in chemistry, "of or containing hydrogen." From 1918 in ecology, "having plentiful water;" see hydro- + -ic.

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eco- 

word-forming element referring to the environment and man's relation to it, abstracted from ecology, ecological; attested from 1969.

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emic (adj.)

"of or pertaining to analysis of cultural phenomena from the inside," 1954, from phonemic.

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multicultural (adj.)

also multi-cultural, of a society, "consisting of varied cultural groups," by 1941; see multi- "many"+ culture (n.) + -al (1). At first often in a Canadian context. Picked up by U.S. education writers 1980s; widespread popular use from c. 1990.

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UNESCO 

acronym from United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, which was created in 1945.

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