Etymology
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experto crede 
Latin, "take it from one who knows" ("Aeneid," xi.283); dative singular of expertus (see expert (adj.)) + imperative singular of credere "to believe" (see credo).
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credible (adj.)

"believable, worthy of belief, capable of being believed, involving no impossibility; of known or obvious veracity or competence," late 14c., from Latin credibilis "worthy to be believed," from credere "to believe" (see credo). Related: Credibly.

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creditor (n.)

mid-15c., "one to whom any return is due or payable, one to whom money is owed," from Anglo-French creditour, Old French creditor (early 14c.), from Latin creditor "truster; lender," from creditus, past participle of credere "to believe" (see credo).

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miscreant (adj.)

c. 1300, "non-Christian, misbelieving, pagan, infidel;" early 15c., "heretical, unbelieving," from Old French mescreant "disbelieving" (Modern French mécréant), from mes- "wrongly" (see mis- (2)) + creant, present participle of creire "believe," from Latin credere "to believe" (see credo). Meaning "villainous, vile, detestable" is from 1590s. Related: Miscreance; miscreancy.

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credence (n.)

"belief, trust in facts derived from other than personal knowledge; that which gives a claim to belief," mid-14c., from Medieval Latin credentia "belief," from Latin credentum (nominative credens), past participle of credere "believe, trust" (see credo).

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credential (n.)

"that which entitles to credit," 1756, probably a back-formation from credentials, from Medieval Latin credentialis, from credentia "belief," from Latin credere "to believe, trust" (see credo). Rare in the singular form. Earlier in English as an adjective, "confirming, corroborating" (late 15c.). As a verb, "provide with credentials," by 1828 (implied in credentialed).

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credentials (n.)

"letters entitling the bearer to certain credit or confidence," 1670s, from Medieval Latin credentialis, from credentia  "belief," from Latin credere "to believe, trust" (see credo). Probably immediately as a shortening of letters credential (1520s, with French word order); earlier was letter of credence (mid-14c.). Especially in reference to the letters of authorization given by a government to an ambassador.

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incroyable (n.)

1796, from French incroyable, literally "incredible" (15c.), from in- "not, opposite of, without" (see in- (1)) + croire "to believe," from Latin credere "to believe" (see credo). A name for the French fop or dandy of the period of the Directory (1795-1799). Said to be so called from their extravagant dress, and also, according to OED, from a favorite expression among them ("C'est vraiment incroyable").

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credulity (n.)

early 15c., "faith, belief," from Old French credulité (12c.), from Latin credulitatem (nominative credulitas) "easiness of belief, rash confidence," noun of quality from credulus "that easily believes, trustful," from credere "to believe" (see credo). Meaning "a weak or ignorant disregard of the importance of evidence, a disposition too ready to believe," especially absurd or impossible things, is from 1540s.

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credo (n.)

early 13c., "the Creed in the Church service," from Latin credo "I believe," the first word of the Apostles' and Nicene creeds, first person singular present indicative of credere "to believe," from PIE compound *kerd-dhe- "to believe," literally "to put one's heart" (source also of Old Irish cretim, Irish creidim, Welsh credu "I believe," Sanskrit śrad-dhā- "faith, confidence, devotion"), from PIE root *kerd- "heart." The nativized form is creed. General sense of "formula or statement of belief" is from 1580s.

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