Etymology
Advertisement
creator (n.)

c. 1300, "the Supreme Being, God considered as the creator of the universe" (also "the communion elements; a crucifix"), from Anglo-French creatour, Old French creator (12c., academic and liturgical, alongside popular creere, Modern French créateur), from Latin creator "creator, author, founder," from creatus (see create). Translated in Old English as scieppend (from verb scieppan; see shape (v.)). Not generally capitalized until KJV. General meaning "one who creates" in any sense is from 1570s. Fem. form creatress is from 1580s (Spenser); creatrix from 1590s.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
heebie-jeebies (n.)
1923, said to have been coined by U.S. cartoonist Billy De Beck (1890-1942), creator of "Barney Google."
Related entries & more 
Tiki (n.)
"large wooden image of the creator-ancestor of Maoris and Polynesians," 1777, from Eastern Polynesian tiki "image." Tiki torch is first recorded 1973.
Related entries & more 
originator (n.)

"an initiator, a creator, one who begins or originates (something)," 1818, agent noun in Latin form from originate.

Related entries & more 
Barbie 
1959, trademark name (reg. U.S.). Supposedly named after the daughter of its creator, U.S. businesswoman Ruth Handler (1916-2002); see Barbara.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
maker (n.)

c. 1300, "one who creates, shapes, forms, or molds," also "God as creator," agent noun from make (v.). Specifically, "manufacturer" by late 14c. To meet (one's) maker "die" is attested by 1814.

Related entries & more 
Frankenstein (n.)

allusive use for man-made monsters dates to 1838, from Baron Frankenstein, character in Mary Shelley's 1818 novel "Frankenstein: The Modern Prometheus." Commonly taken (mistakenly) as the proper name of the monster, not the creator, and thus franken- extended 1990s as a prefix to mean "non-natural." The German surname is probably literally "Franconian Mountain," stein being used especially for steep, rocky peaks, which in the Rhineland often were crowned with castles. The Shelleys might have passed one in their travels. The German surname also suggests "free stone."

Frankenstein is the creator-victim; the creature-despot & fatal creation is Frankenstein's monster. The blunder is very common indeed -- almost, but surely not quite, sanctioned by custom. [Fowler]
Related entries & more 
Muppet (n.)

type of glove-and-rod puppet, trademark (U.S.) Sept. 26, 1972, claiming use from 1971, but in print from Sept. 1970. Coined by creator Jim Henson (1936-1990), who said, despite the resemblance to marionette and puppet (they have qualities of both), it has no etymology; he just liked the sound.

Related entries & more 
Esperanto (n.)
1892, from Doktoro Esperanto, whose name means in Esperanto, "one who hopes," pen name used on the title page of a book about the artificial would-be universal language published 1887 by its Polish-born creator, Lazarus Ludwig Zamenhof (1859-1917). Compare Spanish esperanza "hope," from esperar, from Latin sperare "hope" (see sperate). For initial e- see e-.
Related entries & more 
Marcionite (n.)

1530s, member of an early Christian sect named for the Gnostic Marcion of Sinope (c. 140), who denied any connection between the Old Testament and the New. They contrasted the barbaric and incompetent creator, who favored bandits and killers, with the "higher god" of Christ. They also emphasized virginity and rejection of marriage, and they allowed women to minister. They flourished, especially in the East, until late 4c. The form Marcionist is attested from mid-15c.

Related entries & more