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crazy (adj.)

1570s, "diseased, sickly" (a sense now obsolete); 1580s, "broken, impaired, full of cracks or flaws," from craze + -y (2). Meaning "deranged, demented, of unsound mind or behaving as so" is from 1610s. Jazz slang sense "cool, exciting" is attested by 1927. Related: Crazily; craziness.

To drive (someone) crazy is attested by 1873. To do something like crazy "with manic vigor or frequency" is by 1905. Phrase crazy like a fox has origins by 1935. Crazy Horse, name of the Teton Lakhota (Siouan) war leader (d. 1877), translates thašuka witko, literally "his horse is crazy." Crazy-quilt (1886) preserves the original "break to pieces" sense of craze (v.). Crazy bone as an alternative to funny bone is recorded by 1853.

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stir-crazy (adj.)
1908, from crazy (adj.) + stir (n.) "prison" (1851), probably from Start Newgate (1757), prison in London, later any prison (1823), probably from Romany stardo "imprisoned," related to staripen "a prison." According to Barnhart, mid-19c. sturaban, sturbin "state prison" seem to be transitional forms.
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craziness (n.)

c. 1600, "infirmity, state of being broken down," from crazy + -ness. Oldest sense is now obsolete. The meaning "state of being flawed or damaged" is from 1660s; that of "mental unsoundness" is from 1755.

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tetched (adj.)
1930, U.S. colloquial variant of touched in the sense of "slightly crazy" (see touch (v.)).
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bananas (adj.)
"crazy," 1968; earlier it was noted as an underworld slang term for "sexually perverted" (1935).
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bonkers (adj.)
"crazy," 1957, British slang, perhaps from earlier naval slang meaning "slightly drunk" (1948), from notion of a thump ("bonk") on the head.
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gaga (adj.)
"crazy, silly," 1920, probably from French gaga "senile, foolish," probably imitative of meaningless babbling.
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maddening (adj.)

"driving to distraction, crazy-making," 1743, present-participle adjective from madden. Related: Maddeningly.

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loco (adj.)
"mad, crazy," 1844, American English, from Spanish loco (adj.) "insane," of uncertain origin, perhaps from Arabic lauqa, fem. of 'alwaq "fool, crazy person." Loco-weed was the name given to species of western U.S. plants that cause cattle and horse diseases that make them stagger and act strangely. But the adjective seems to be the older word.
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wack (n.)
"crazy person," 1938, back-formation from wacky. Adjective in slang sense of "worthless, stupid," is attested from late 1990s.
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