Etymology
Advertisement
covered (adj.)

 late 14c., past-participle adjective from cover (v.). Oldest attested sense is in reference to women, "wearing the usual head-covering." Covered wagon is attested by 1745. 

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
calypto- 

word-forming element meaning "hidden, covered," from Latinized form of Greek kalyptos "covered," from kalyptein "to cover, conceal," from PIE root *kel- (1) "to cover, conceal, save."

Related entries & more 
pilose (adj.)

"covered with hair, hairy," 1753, from Latin pilosus "hairy, shaggy, covered with hair," from pilus "hair" (see pile (n.3)). Related: Pilosity (c. 1600).

Related entries & more 
mealy (adj.)

"resembling or consisting of meal," 1530s, from meal (n.2) + -y (2). From 1560s as "covered with fine dust or powder;" 1590s as "containing meal;" 1704 as "covered with flour." Related: Mealiness.

Related entries & more 
wooded (adj.)
"covered with growing trees," c. 1600, from wood (n.).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
pimply (adj.)

"covered with pimples," 1748, from pimple (n.) + -y (2). Related: Pimpliness.

Related entries & more 
gory (adj.)
"covered with clotted blood," late 15c., from gore (n.1) + -y (2).
Related entries & more 
porch (n.)

c. 1300, porche, "covered entrance; roofed structure, usually open on the front and sides, before an entrance to a building," from Old French porche "porch, vestibule," from Latin porticus "covered gallery, covered walk between columns, arcade, portico, porch," from porta "city gate, gate; door, entrance," from PIE root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over."

The Latin word was borrowed directly into Old English as portic. Especially (late 14c.) "a covered walk or colonnade on the front or side of a building." In U.S., used by 1832 for what the British call a veranda.

Related entries & more 
gravelly (adj.)
late 14c., "covered with gravel or sand," from gravel + -y (2). Of voices, by 1943.
Related entries & more 
foamy (adj.)
Old English faemig "covered with foam;" see foam (n.) + -y (2). Related: Foaminess.
Related entries & more