Etymology
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cough (v.)

"a violent, noisy effort to expel air from the lungs," early 14c., coughen, probably in Old English but not recorded, from Proto-Germanic *kokh-(source also of Middle Dutch kochen, Middle High German kuchen), with the rough "kh" of German or of Scottish loch. Onomatopoeic. Related: Coughed; coughing.

As a noun from c. 1300, "single act of coughing." As "illness or other condition that affects the sufferer with frequent coughs or fits of coughing," by 1742. Cough-drops attested by 1829; cough-medicine by 1828. To cough up "to present, hand over" is from 1894.

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tussive (adj.)
"pertaining to cough," 1857, from Latin tussis "a cough," of unknown origin, + -ive.
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pertussis (n.)

"whooping cough," 1670s (Sydenham), from Modern Latin pertussis, from per- "thoroughly," or here perhaps with intensive force (see per), + tussis "cough," a word of unknown origin.

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hack (v.3)
"to cough with a short, dry cough," 1802, perhaps from hack (v.1) on the notion of being done with difficulty, or else imitative.
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hiccough 
1620s, a more recent variant of hiccup (q.v.) by mistaken association with cough.
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hack (n.3)
"a short, hard cough," 1885, from hack (v.3).
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ugh 

1765, imitative of the sound of a cough; as an interjection of disgust, recorded from 1822. Form ough is from 1560s.

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retch (v.)

1540s, "to clear the throat, to cough up phlegm" (a sense now obsolete), from Old English hræcan "to cough up, spit" (related to hraca "phlegm"), from Proto-Germanic *khrækijan (source also of Old High German rahhison "to clear one's throat"), of imitative origin (compare Lithuanian kregėti "to grunt"). Meaning "make efforts to vomit" is from 1850; sense of "to vomit" is attested by 1888. Related: Retched; retching.

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whoop (v.)
mid-14c., houpen, partly imitative, partly from Old French huper, houper "to cry out, shout," also imitative. It is attested as an interjection from at least mid-15c. Spelling with wh- is from mid-15c. The noun is recorded from c. 1600. Phrase whoop it up "create a disturbance" is recorded from 1881. Expression whoop-de-do is recorded from 1929. Whooping cough (1739) is now the prevalent spelling of hooping cough; whooping crane is recorded from 1791.
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smoker (n.)
1590s, "one who cures meat," agent noun from smoke (v.). Meaning "one who smokes tobacco" is from 1610s. Railway meaning "smoking car" is from 1875. Smoker's cough attested from 1898.
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