Etymology
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correct (v.)

mid-14c., "to set (someone) right by punishing for a fault or error, to discipline;" late 14c., of texts, "to bring into accordance with a standard or original," from Latin correctus, past participle of corrigere "to put straight, attempt to make (a crooked thing) straight, reduce to order, set right;" in transferred use, "to reform, amend," especially of speech or writing, from assimilated form of com-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see com-), + regere "to lead straight, rule" (from PIE root *reg- "move in a straight line," with derivatives meaning "to direct in a straight line," thus "to lead, rule").

Meaning "to remove or counteract the operation of" is from late 14c. Related: Corrected; correcting.

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correct (adj.)

"in accordance or agreement with a certain standard, model, or original," 1670s, from French correct "right, proper," from Latin correctus, past participle of corrigere "to put straight; to reform" (see correct (v.)). Related: Correctly; correctness.

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correctable (adj.)

"able to be corrected," mid-15c., from correct (v.) + -able. Form correctible is attested by 1784. Related: Correctability.

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correctness (n.)

1680s, "state or quality of being in conformity with an acknowledged rule or standard of what is considered true, right, moral, or proper," from correct (adj.) + -ness.

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corrective (adj.)

"having the power to correct," 1530s, from French correctif, from Latin correct-, past-participle stem of corrigere "to put straight; to reform" (see correct (v.)). As a noun, "that which has the power of correction," from 1610s.

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corrigendum (n.)

"a word or phrase in print that is to be corrected or altered," 1718, from Latin corrigendum (plural corrigenda) "that which is to be corrected," neuter gerundive of corrigere "to correct" (see correct (v.)).

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corrigible (adj.)

mid-15c., "capable of being corrected or amended," from Old French corrigible, from Medieval Latin corrigibilis "that which can be corrected," from Latin corrigere "to put straight; to reform" (see correct (v.)). Of persons, "capable of being reformed in character," 1580s. Related: Corrigibility.

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Corregidor 

island at the entrance to Manila Bay in the Philippines, fortified 18c. by the Spanish, it was the place where the maritime registrar recorded the particulars of ships entering the bay, hence the name, from Spanish corregidor "chief magistrate of a town," etymologically "correcter," from Latin corrigere "to put straight; to reform" (see correct (v.)).

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incorrect (adj.)
early 15c., "uncorrected, not chastened into obedience," of sinners, etc. (a sense now obsolete), from Latin incorrectus "uncorrected, not revised," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + correctus, past participle of corrigere "to put straight; to reform" (see correct (v.)). Sense of "not in good style" is from 1670s; that of "factually wrong, erroneous, inaccurate" is from 1750s (implied in incorrectly).
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escort (n.)

1570s, in military sense, "an armed guard," later generally, "a protecting, guiding, or honorary guard; protection or safeguard on a journey or excursion," from French escorte (16c.), from Italian scorta, literally "a guiding," from scorgere "to guide," from Vulgar Latin *excorrigere, from ex- "out" (see ex-) + Latin corrigere "set right" (see correct (v.)). The sense of "person accompanying another to a social occasion" is 1936; as a person hired by a client for sexual services by 1974.

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