Etymology
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corona (n.)

1650s, "a crown," from Latin corona "a crown, a garland," in ancient Rome especially "a crown or garland bestowed for distinguished military service" (from a suffixed form of PIE root *sker- (2) "to turn, bend").

With many extended senses in botany, anatomy, etc. As a brand of Cuban cigar, 1876. The brand of Mexican pale lager beer dates from 1925. The astronomical sense of "luminous circle observed around the sun during total eclipses" is from 1809. The two "crown" constellations, Corona Borealis and Corona Australis, both are Ptolemaic.

Corona Borealis "certainly is much more like that for which it is named than usually is the case with our sky figures," according to Richard Hinckley Allen ("Star-Names and Their Meaning," 1899), and he adds that to the Greeks it was stephanos, a wreath, and from Roman times on typically it was Ariadne's Crown. To Arab astronomers, however, it was Al Fakkah "the dish" (sometimes "the pauper's dish" or "the broken dish" — Latinized as Discus parvus confractus — as the celestial circle is incomplete), a word wrestled into European languages as Alphaca or Alphecca, and used as the name of the constellation's none-too-bright brightest star.

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virus (n.)
Origin and meaning of virus

late 14c., "poisonous substance" (a sense now archaic), from Latin virus "poison, sap of plants, slimy liquid, a potent juice," from Proto-Italic *weis-o-(s-) "poison," which is probably from a PIE root *ueis-, perhaps originally meaning "to melt away, to flow," used of foul or malodorous fluids, but with specialization in some languages to "poisonous fluid" (source also of Sanskrit visam "venom, poison," visah "poisonous;" Avestan vish- "poison;" Latin viscum "sticky substance, birdlime;" Greek ios "poison," ixos "mistletoe, birdlime;" Old Church Slavonic višnja "cherry;" Old Irish fi "poison;" Welsh gwy "poison").

The meaning "agent that causes infectious disease" emerged by 1790s gradually out of the earlier use in reference to venereal disease (by 1728); the modern scientific use dates to the 1880s. The computer sense is from 1972.

VIRUS (among Physicians) a kind of watery stinking Matter, which issues out of Ulcers, being endued with eating and malignant Qualities. [Bailey's dictionary, 1770]
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Epstein-Barr virus 
1968, named for British virologist Michael Anthony Epstein and Irish-born virologist Yvonne M. Barr.
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coronavirus (n.)

type of RNA virus affecting birds and mammals, in humans as a respiratory tract infection, by 1968, is so called for the spikes that protrude from its membranes and resemble the corona of the sun; see corona.  Covid as a contraction of coronavirus disease seems to have been coined for the outbreak that began in China in 2019 (COVID-19).

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virion (n.)
coined in French, 1959, from virus (see virus) + -on.
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viral (adj.)
"of the nature of, or caused by, a virus," 1944, see virus + -al (1). Sense of "become suddenly widely popular through internet sharing" is attested by 1999, originally in reference to marketing and based on the similarity of the effect to the spread of a computer virus. Related: Virally.
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parvovirus (n.)

type of very small virus, 1965, from parvi- "small, little" + connecting element -o- + virus.

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rotavirus (n.)
wheel-shaped virus causing inflammation of the lining of the intestines, 1974, from Latin rota "wheel" (see rotary) + virus.
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coronet (n.)

"a small crown," c. 1400, crownet, from Old French coronete, diminutive of corone "a crown," from Latin corona "crown" (see crown (n.)).

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coronal (adj.)

1540s, "pertaining to a crown" (or, later, to one of the extended senses of Latin corona), from French coronal (16c.), from Latin coronalis "of or pertaining to a crown," from corona "a crown" (see crown (n.)).

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