Etymology
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cork (n.)

c. 1300, "the light, elastic outer bark of a species of oak tree native to Iberia and North Africa, used for many purposes," from Spanish alcorque "cork sole," probably from earlier Spanish corcho, from Latin quercus "oak" (see Quercus) or cortex (genitive corticis) "bark" (see corium).

In reference to the tree itself, mid-15c. From late 14c. as "cork-soled shoe." As "cork float for a fishing line," mid-15c. Meaning "cylindrical cork stopper or bung for a bottle, etc.," 1520s. As an adjective, "made of cork," 1716.

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Cork 
place in Ireland, Englished from Irish Corcaigh, from corcach "marsh."
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cork (v.)

1570s, "to put a cork sole on a shoe," from cork (n.)). Meaning "to stop with a cork" is from 1640s. Figurative sense "to stop or check" is from 1640s. Meaning "blacken with burnt cork," especially the face, to perform in theatrical blackface, is from 1836. Related: Corked; corking.

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corkscrew (n.)

"tool used to draw corks from bottles," 1720, from cork (n.) + screw (n.). Given various figurative or extended senses from c. 1815; the verb is attested from 1837 (transitive), 1853 intransitive.

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corky (adj.)

c. 1600, "light, buoyant" (as cork is), hence, figuratively, of persons "lively;" from cork (n.) + -y (2). Of bottled liquors or wine, "having a flavor of cork," by 1840. Related: Corkiness.

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corkage (n.)

"the corking or uncorking of bottles," specifically in reference to a charge by hotel-keepers, etc., for serving wine and liquor not furnished by the house, 1838, from cork (v.) + -age.

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corker (n.)

"unanswerable fact or argument," 1837, slang, something that "settles" a debate, discussion, conflict, etc.; hence "something astonishing" (1880s). Probably an agent noun from cork (v.) on the notion is of putting a cork in a bottle as an act of finality. Corker in the literal sense of "one who or that which corks" is from 1880.

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estoppel (n.)
1530s, from estop, or from Old French estopail "bung, cork," from estoper.
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clunk (v.)

1796, "to make the sound of a cork being pulled from a bottle;" imitative. This was the main sense through most of 19c. Meaning "to hit, strike" is attested from 1943 (perhaps a variant of clonk). Related: Clunked; clunking. As a noun, in reference to the cork-pulling sound, by 1823.

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shive (n.)
early 13c., "slice of bread; thin piece cut off," perhaps from an unrecorded Old English *scifa, cognate with Old Saxon sciva, Middle Dutch schive, Dutch schijf, Old High German sciba, German Scheibe; see skive (v.1). From 1869 as "thin, flat cork for a bottle."
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