Etymology
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continue (v.)

mid-14c., contynuen, "maintain, sustain, preserve;" late 14c., "go forward or onward; persevere in," from Old French continuer (13c.) and directly from Latin continuare "join together in uninterrupted succession, make or be continuous, do successively one after another," from continuus "joining, connecting with something; following one after another," from continere (intransitive) "to be uninterrupted," literally "to hang together" (see contain). Related: Continued; continuing.

Sense of "to carry on from the point of suspension" is from early 15c. Meaning "to remain in a state, place, or office" is from early 15c. Transitive sense of "to extend from one point to another" is from 1660s. Meaning "to postpone a hearing or trial" is from mid-15c.

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recontinue (v.)

"to go on again with (an activity, etc.) that had been discontinued," early 15c., from re- "back, again" + continue (v.). Related: Recontinued; recontinuing.

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contango (n.)

1853, "charge made or percentage received by a broker or seller for deferring settlement of a stock sale," a stockbroker's invention, perhaps somehow derived from continue, or from Spanish contengo "I contain, refrain, restrain, check." Continuation was used in this sense from 1813. As a verb, from 1900.

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continuance (n.)

mid-14c., "perseverance, a keeping up, a going on," from Old French continuance (13c.), from continuer (see continue). From late 14c. as "a holding on or remaining in a particular state;" in law, "the deferring of a trial or hearing to a future date" (early 15c.).

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discontinuance (n.)

"action of breaking off, intermission, interruption," late 14c., from Anglo-French discontinuance, from Old French discontinuer "to discontinue," from Medieval Latin discontinuare, from dis- "not" (see dis-) + Latin continuare "to continue" (see continue).

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discontinue (v.)

late 14c., discontinuen, "be interrupted, cease, stop," from Old French discontinuer (14c.), from Medieval Latin discontinuare "discontinue," from dis- "not" (see dis-) + Latin continuare "to continue" (see continue). Transitive sense "cause to cease" is from late 15c. Related: Discontinued; discontinuity; discontinuous; discontinuation.

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*ten- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to stretch," with derivatives meaning "something stretched, a string; thin."

It forms all or part of: abstain; abstention; abstinence; abstinent; atelectasis; attend; attenuate; attenuation; baritone; catatonia; catatonic; contain; contend; continue; detain; detente; detention; diatonic; distend; entertain; extend; extenuate; hypotenuse; hypotonia; intend; intone (v.1) "to sing, chant;" isotonic; lieutenant; locum-tenens; maintain; monotony; neoteny; obtain; ostensible; peritoneum; pertain; pertinacious; portend; pretend; rein; retain; retinue; sitar; subtend; sustain; tantra; telangiectasia; temple (n.1) "building for worship;" temple (n.2) "flattened area on either side of the forehead;" temporal; tenable; tenacious; tenacity; tenant; tend (v.1) "to incline, to move in a certain direction;" tendency; tender (adj.) "soft, easily injured;" tender (v.) "to offer formally;" tendon; tendril; tenement; tenesmus; tenet; tennis; tenon; tenor; tense (adj.) "stretched tight;" tensile; tension; tensor; tent (n.) "portable shelter;" tenterhooks; tenuous; tenure; tetanus; thin; tone; tonic.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit tantram "loom," tanoti "stretches, lasts," tanuh "thin," literally "stretched out;" Persian tar "string;" Lithuanian tankus "compact," i.e. "tightened;" Greek teinein "to stretch," tasis "a stretching, tension," tenos "sinew," tetanos "stiff, rigid," tonos "string," hence "sound, pitch;" Latin tenere "to hold, grasp, keep, have possession, maintain," tendere "to stretch," tenuis "thin, rare, fine;" Old Church Slavonic tento "cord;" Old English þynne "thin."

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demotivate (v.)

"cause to lose motivation; deprive of incentive to continue," by 1974; see de- + motivate. Related: Demotivated; demotivating; demotivation.

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persevere (v.)

"to persist in what one has undertaken, to pursue steadily a design or course," late 14c., perseveren, from Old French perseverer "continue, persevere, endure" and directly from Latin perseverare "continue steadfastly, persist," from persevereus "very strict, earnest," from per "very" (see per) + severus "serious, grave, strict, austere," which is probably from PIE root *segh- "to have, hold," on the notion of "steadfastness, toughness." Related: Persevered; persevering.

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persist (v.)

"continue steadily and firmly in some state or course of action," especially in spite of opposition or remonstrance; "persevere obstinately," 1530s, from French persister (14c.), from Latin persistere "abide, continue steadfastly," from per "thoroughly" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + sistere "come to stand, cause to stand still" (from PIE *si-st-, reduplicated form of root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm"). Related: Persisted; persisting.

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