Etymology
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analysis (n.)

1580s, "resolution of anything complex into simple elements" (opposite of synthesis), from Medieval Latin analysis (15c.), from Greek analysis "solution of a problem by analysis," literally "a breaking up, a loosening, releasing," noun of action from analyein "unloose, release, set free; to loose a ship from its moorings," in Aristotle, "to analyze," from ana "up, back, throughout" (see ana-) + lysis "a loosening," from lyein "to unfasten" (from PIE root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart").

The meaning "statement presenting results of an analytic process" is from 1660s. The psychological sense is from 1890. English also formerly had a noun analyse (1630s), from French analyse, from Medieval Latin analysis. Phrase in the final (or last) analysis (1844), translates French en dernière analyse.

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content (v.)

early 15c., "to rest or be satisfied; to give satisfaction to," from Old French contenter (from content (adj.) "satisfied") and Medieval Latin contentare, both from Latin contentus "contained; satisfied," past participle of continere "to hold together, enclose," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + tenere "to hold" (from PIE root *ten- "to stretch").

Sense connection of "contained" and "satisfied" probably is that the contented person's desires are bound by what he or she already has. Related: Contented; contenting.

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content (adj.)

c. 1400, literally "held or contained within limits," hence "having the desire limited to present enjoyments," from Old French content, "satisfied," from Latin contentus "contained, satisfied," past participle of continere "to hold together, enclose," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + tenere "to hold" (from PIE root *ten- "to stretch"). Related: Contently (largely superseded by contentedly).

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content (n.1)

"state of mind which results from satisfaction with present circumstances," 1570s, from content (adj.). Phrase heart's content is from 1590s (Shakespeare).

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content (n.2)

"that which is contained;" see contents.

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self-analysis (n.)

"analysis by or of oneself," 1860; see self- + analysis.

Trying to define yourself is like trying to bite your own teeth. [attributed to Alan Watts, who did often use the image in this sense in his talks, if not in these exact words]
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analyst (n.)

1650s, "one versed in algebraic analysis, mathematician skilled in algebraic geometry," from French analyste "a person who analyzes," from analyser, from analyse "analysis," from Medieval Latin analysis (see analysis). As a short form of psychoanalyst, attested from 1914; the one analyzed is an analysand (1933). Greek analyter meant "a deliverer."

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psychoanalysis (n.)

"the theory or therapy of treating mental disorders by investigating unconscious elements and bringing repressed fears and conflicts to the patient's awareness," from Psychoanalyse, coined 1896 in French by Freud from Latinized form of Greek psykhē "the soul, mind, spirit; understanding" (see psyche) + German Analyse, from Greek analysis (see analysis). Freud earlier used psychische analyse (1894).

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emic (adj.)

"of or pertaining to analysis of cultural phenomena from the inside," 1954, from phonemic.

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