Etymology
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consulate (n.)

late 14c., "government of Rome by the consuls," from Latin consulatus "office of a consul," from consul (see consul). Also used in reference to the consular government of France from 1799-1804. In reference to the office of a modern consul in international law, from 1702 (earlier in this sense was consulship, 1610s).

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mozzarella (n.)

kind of soft, white Italian cheese originally made in Naples area, 1911, from Italian mozzarella, diminutive of mozza "slice, slice of cheese," from mozzare "to cut off," from Vulgar Latin *mutius "cut off, blunted," which is related to Latin mutilus "maimed" (see mutilation). There is an isolated 1881 use, as an Italian word in English, in a U.S. consulate report from Italy.

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interregnum (n.)
1580s, from Latin interregnum "an interval between two reigns," literally "between-reign," from inter "between" (see inter-) + regnum "kingship, dominion, rule, realm," related to regere "to rule, to direct, keep straight, guide" (from PIE root *reg- "move in a straight line," with derivatives meaning "to direct in a straight line," thus "to lead, rule"). In the republic, it meant a vacancy in the consulate. The earlier English noun was interreign (1530s), from French interrègne (14c.).
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