Advertisement
46 entries found.
Search filter: All Results 
consciousness (n.)

1630s, "internal knowledge," from conscious + -ness. Meaning "state of being aware of what passes in one's own mind" is from 1670s; meaning "state of being aware" of anything is from 1746. Consciousness-raising is attested from 1968.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
sentience (n.)
1817, "faculty of sense; feeling, consciousness;" see sentient + -ence. Related: Sentiency (1796).
Related entries & more 
preconscious (adj.)

"pertaining to or involving a state anterior to consciousness," 1860, from pre- "before" + conscious (adj.).

Related entries & more 
subconscious (adj.)
1823, "not wholly conscious, feebly conscious" (implied in subconsciously), from sub- + conscious. First attested in De Quincey. The noun, in the psychological sense ("mental processes taking place without consciousness"), is attested from 1886, from adjectival sense "occurring in the mind, but not in consciousness;" earlier noun was subconsciousness (1845).
Related entries & more 
grand mal 
"convulsive epilepsy" (with loss of consciousness), 1842 as a French term in English, from French grand mal, literally "great sickness" (see grand (adj.)). Opposed to petit mal.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
subliminal (adj.)
1873, "below the threshold" (of consciousness or sensation), formed from Latin stem of sublime (Latin limen, genitive liminis) + -al (1)). Apparently a loan-translation of German unter der Schwelle (des Bewusstseins) "beneath the threshold (of consciousness)," from Johann Friedrich Herbart (1776-1841), author of a textbook on psychology published in 1824. The scare over subliminal advertising came in 1957. Related: Subliminally.
Related entries & more 
remorseful (adj.)

"characterized by remorse, burdened with a painful sense of guilt and penitence due to consciousness of guilt," 1590s, from remorse + -ful. Related: Remorsefully; remorsefulness.

Related entries & more 
pass out (v.)

"lose consciousness," 1915, from pass (v.) + out. Probably a weakened sense from earlier meaning "to die" (1899). Meaning "to distribute" is attested from 1926. Related: Passed out.

Related entries & more 
automatism (n.)

1803, "the doctrine that animals below man are devoid of consciousness;" see automaton + -ism. By 1856 as "automatic or involuntary action."

Related entries & more 
mentalist (n.)

1782, "one devoted to mental pleasures," from mental + -ist. Originally in reference to artistic taste; philosophical sense "one who believes matter in ultimate analysis is a mode of mind or consciousness" (from mentalism) is from 1900. Related: Mentalistic.

Related entries & more