Etymology
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syndetic (adj.)
"connecting," 1874, from -ic + Greek syndetos "bound together," adjective of syndein (see asyndeton).
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blackamoor (n.)
"dark-skinned person, black-skinned African," 1540s, from black (adj.) + Moor, with connecting element.
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parvovirus (n.)

type of very small virus, 1965, from parvi- "small, little" + connecting element -o- + virus.

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MIDI 

"device for connecting computers and electronic musical instruments," 1983, acronym for Musical Instrument Digital Interface.

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connector (n.)
1795, "tube for connecting other materials," agent noun in Latin form from connect and usefully distinct from connecter.
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snub (adj.)
"short and turned up," 1725, in snub-nosed, from snub (v.). The connecting notion is of being "cut short."
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connective (adj.)

"having the power of connecting, serving to connect," 1650s, from connect + -ive (if from Latin, it likely would have been *connexive). Connective tissue is from 1839.

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cross-tie (n.)

"transverse connecting piece of lumber," later especially "a railway tie, timber placed under opposite rails for support and to prevent spreading," from cross- + tie (n.).

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paling (n.)

"fence formed by connecting pointed vertical stakes by horizontal rails above and below," 1550s, from pale (n.).

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bonding (n.)
"a binding or connecting together," 1670s, originally in the laying of bricks, stones, etc.; verbal noun from bond (v.)). Male bonding is attested by 1969.
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