Etymology
Advertisement
conjunction (n.)

late 14c., "a joining or meeting of individuals or distinct things," originally of planets or stars "meeting" in the same part of the sky, from Old French conjonction "union, joining, sexual intercourse" (12c.), from Latin coniunctionem (nominative coniunctio), noun of action from past-participle stem of coniugare "to join together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + iugare "to join," from iugum "yoke" (from PIE root *yeug- "to join").

Compare Italian congiunzione, Spanish conjunción, from the same Latin noun. The English word also had the meaning "sexual union" 17c.-18c. Old English used geðeodnys as a loan-translation of Latin coniunctio

Grammatical sense of "connective particle serving to unite clauses of a sentence or coordinate words in a clause or sentence" (late 14c.) was in Latin, a loan-translation of Greek syndesmos.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
syzygy (n.)
"conjunction or opposition of a heavenly body with the sun," 1650s, from Late Latin syzygia, from Greek syzygia "yoke of animals, pair, union of two, conjunction," from syzygein "to yoke together," from assimilated form of syn- "together" (see syn-) + zygon "yoke" (from PIE root *yeug- "to join"). Related: Syzygial; Syzygiacal; Syzygetic.
Related entries & more 
whereas (adv.)

mid-14c., "where;" early 15c. as a conjunction, "in consideration of the fact that, considering that things are so; while on the contrary," from where (in the sense of "in which position or circumstances") + as.

Related entries & more 
co-belligerent (n.)

"one who is mutually at war" (as distinguished from an ally), 1813, a word from the Napoleonic wars, from co- + belligerent. As an adjective, "carrying on war in conjunction with another power," from 1828.

Related entries & more 
whilom (adv.)
"at time past" (archaic), c. 1200, from Old English hwilum "at times," dative case of while (q.v.). As a conjunction from 1610s. Similar formation in German weiland "formerly."
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
part of speech (n.)

"a word viewed as a constituent member of a sentence," c. 1500, translating Latin pars orationis (see parse). The parts of speech are: Noun, adjective, pronoun, verb, adverb, preposition, conjunction, and interjection. Sometimes article and participle are counted among them.

Related entries & more 
provided (conj.)

"with or on condition that; this (or it) being understood, conceded, or established," early 15c., conjunction use of past participle of provide. As an adjective, "destined" (early 15c.); "prepared, ready" (1570s); "furnished" (1878).

Related entries & more 
without (adv., prep.)
Old English wiðutan "outside of, from outside," literally "against the outside" (opposite of within), see with + out (adv.). As a word expressing lack or want of something (opposite of with), attested from c. 1200. In use by late 14c. as a conjunction, short for without that.
Related entries & more 
anyhow (adv.)
1740, "in any way or manner," from any + how (adv.). Unlike most other any + (interrogative) compounds, there is no record of it in Old or Middle English. Compare anyway (16c.). Also used as a conjunction, "in any case." Emphatic form any old how is recorded from 1900, American English.
Related entries & more 
team (v.)
1550s, "to harness beasts in a team," from team (n.). From 1841 as "drive a team." The meaning "to come together as a team" (usually with up) is attested from 1932. Transitive sense "to use (something) in conjunction" (with something else) is from 1948. Related: Teamed; teaming. The Old English verb, teaman, tieman, is attested only in the sense "bring forth, beget, engender, propagate."
Related entries & more