Etymology
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Congo 
African nation, named for the river that runs through it, which is from a Bantu word meaning "mountains" (i.e., the river that flows from the mountains). As an adjective, Congoese is native English (1797) but has been supplanted by Congolese (1900), from French Congolais.
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conga (n.)

type of Latin American dance, "usu. performed by several people in single file and consisting of three steps forward followed by a kick" [OED], 1935, from American Spanish, fem. of (danza) Congo "Congo (dance)" (see Congo); so called because it was assumed to be of African origin. As a verb by 1941. Related: Congaed; congaing.

Congo was used in the U.S. to form the names of dances associated with slaves from 1803. Congo dance is attested from 1823.

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Kwa 
Niger-Congo language family (including Ibo and Yoruba), 1857.
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Wolof (n.)
African people of Senegal and Gambia. Also the name of the Niger-Congo language they speak.
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Belgian (adj.)
1620s, in reference to the ancient Belgæ (see Belgium). The modern country was formed 1830-31. Belgian Congo formed 1908 by annexation.
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Macaca 

name of a genus of Old World monkeys, Modern Latin, from Portuguese macaca, fem. of macaco, a name from an African language of the Congo (compare macaque).

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Zaire 
African nation (1971-1997), from an early alternative name of the Congo River, from Kikongo nzai, dialectal form of nzadi "river."
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okapi (n.)

short-necked, stripe-legged giraffe of central Africa, 1900, from the animal's name in Mbuba (Congo). Reported by English explorer Sir Harry Johnston.

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ebola (n.)
virus, 1976, named for Ebola River valley in Congo, where it first was studied.
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Ashanti (n.)
also Ashantee, 1705, Asiantines, one of the Akan people of central Ghana; a native name. The language, part of the Niger-Congo family, is so called by 1874.
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