Etymology
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conduct (v.)
Origin and meaning of conduct

early 15c., "to guide, accompany and show the way," from Latin conductus, past participle of conducere "to lead or bring together; contribute, serve," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + ducere "to lead" (from PIE root *deuk- "to lead").

Sense of "to lead, command, direct, manage" is from mid-15c., originally military. General meaning "to direct, manage, act as leader of" is from 1630s; especially of a musical performance (1791).

Meaning "behave in a certain way" is from 1710. In physics, "to carry, convey, transmit," 1740. Related: Conducted; conducting. An earlier verb in the same sense was condyten (c. 1400), which goes with conduit.

To conduct is to lead along, hence to attend with personal supervision; it implies the determination of the main features of administration and the securing of thoroughness in those who carry out the commands; it is used of both large things and small, but generally refers to a definite task, coming to an end or issue: as, to conduct a religious service, a funeral, a campaign. [Century Dictionary]
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conduct (n.)
Origin and meaning of conduct

mid-15c., "action of guiding or leading, guide" (in sauf conducte), from Medieval Latin conductus, from past-participle stem of Latin conducere "to lead or bring together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + ducere "to lead" (from PIE root *deuk- "to lead"). Sense of "personal behavior" is first recorded 1670s. A doublet of conduit.

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safe-conduct (n.)

 "privilege of safe passage" granted by an authority, late 13c., from Old French sauf-conduit (13c.); see safe (adj.) + conduct (n.).

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misconduct (n.)

1710, "bad management, neglect;" see mis- (1) "bad, wrong" + conduct (n.). Meaning "wrong conduct" is attested from 1729.

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misconduct (v.)

"mismanage, conduct amiss," 1707 (implied in misconducted), from mis- (1) "badly, wrongly" + conduct (v.). Related: Misconducting.

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conductive (adj.)

1520s, "having the power or property of leading" (a sense now obsolete), from conduct (v.) + -ive. Physics sense, "resulting from or pertaining to conduction," is from 1840. Related: Conductivity (1837).

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conduit (n.)

c. 1300, conduyt, "conduct, guidance, an escorting party" (a sense now obsolete in this word but preserved in its doublet, conduct), from Old French conduit (12c.) "escort, protection; pipe, channel," from Latin conductus "a leading, a pipe," noun use of past participle of conducere "to lead or bring together; contribute, serve," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + ducere "to lead" (from PIE root *deuk- "to lead").

Conduct and conduit differentiated in meaning from 15c. Conduit in the sense "medium or means of conveying" is from mid-14c.; as "pipe or tube or other channel for conveyance of water," late 14c.

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*deuk- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to lead."

It forms all or part of: abduce; abducent; abduct; abduction; adduce; aqueduct; circumduction; conduce; conducive; conduct; conductor; conduit; deduce; deduction; dock (n.1) "ship's berth;" doge; douche; ducal; ducat; Duce; duchess; duchy; duct; ductile; duke (n.); educate; education; induce; induction; introduce; introduction; misconduct; produce; production; reduce; reduction; seduce; seduction; subduce; subduction; taut; team (n.); teem (v.1) "abound, swarm, be prolific;" tie (n.); tow (v.); traduce; transducer; tug; zugzwang.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Latin dux (genitive ducis) "leader, commander," in Late Latin "governor of a province," ducere "to lead;" Old English togian "to pull, drag," teonteon "to pull, drag;" German Zaum "bridle," ziehen "to draw, pull, drag;" Middle Welsh dygaf "I draw."
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indecency (n.)
1580s, "outrageous conduct," from Latin indecentia "unseemliness, impropriety," abstract noun from indecentem "unbecoming" (see indecent). Now especially of conduct which violates recognized standards of propriety (1690s).
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sportsmanship (n.)
"conduct worthy of a sportsman," 1745, from sportsman + -ship.
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